Nous utilisons des cookies pour vous garantir la meilleure expérience sur notre site. Si vous continuez à utiliser ce dernier, nous considèrerons que vous acceptez l'utilisation des cookies. J'ai compris ! ou En savoir plus !.
Un Planet est un site Web dynamique qui agrège le plus souvent sur une seule page, le contenu de notes, d'articles ou de billets publiés sur des blogs ou sites Web afin d'accentuer leur visibilité et de faire ressortir des contenus pertinents aux multiples formats (texte, audio, vidéo, Podcast). C'est un agrégateur de flux RSS. Il s'apparente à un portail web.
Vous pouvez lire le billet sur le blog La Minute pour plus d'informations sur les RSS !
  • Feeds
  • Categories
  • Tags
  • Feeds

    2233 items (4 unread) in 55 feeds

    Géomatique anglophone

     
    • sur SIG Libre Uruguay: web gratuito «Asociación con EOS Data Analytics: Ventajas de su red de socios y soporte».

      Posted: 7 November 2023, 5:14pm CET

      Todo tipo de empresas y organizaciones orientadas a la agricultura están invitadas a asistir al seminario web, así como periodistas, activistas, y ecologistas interesados en la agricultura de precisión.
      Cuándo: 21 de noviembre
      Hora: 9 AM CST / 4 PM CET
      Los ponentes del seminario web serán:
      Dmytro Svyrydenko, Ejecutivo de cuentas, EOSD?
      Pablo Ezequiel Escudero, Socio gerente, Agro Gestión
      Esteban Moschin, Consultor de Negocios Independiente, Agro Gestión
      Pablo Astudillo, Gerente General, BM Monitoring
      Daniel Marulanda, Director General de Tecnología, GeoSat
      Los ponentes debatirán sobre los siguientes temas:
      Beneficios del Programa de socios y soporte de EOSDA.
      Transformación de la agricultura en Argentina en los últimos 10 años. Cómo cambió en este tiempo el servicio de consultoría agrícola.
      La agricultura de precisión en España. Gestores y asesores agrícolas y su rol en la transformación de la agricultura en el país.
      El rol de los consultores y asesores agrícolas en Chile. Requisitos principales de los clientes para cubrir todas sus necesidades.
      Solución de marca blanca, qué ventajas tiene y proyecto con la FAO. Recomendaciones para los clientes que quieren pasarse a marca blanca.
      Para obtener más información, presione aquí.
      Idioma: Español
      Duración: 1,5 horas.
    • sur The Interactive Pathfinding Map

      Posted: 7 November 2023, 10:20am CET by Keir Clarke
      The Pathfinding Visualizer is an interactive pathfinding tool that allows you to discover the most direct route between any two points in the world, using a number of different pathfinding algorithms. A map pathfinding algorithm is a way to find the shortest or most efficient route between different points on a map. It helps you find the best path to go from one location to another, considering
    • sur SIG Libre Uruguay: Tercera edición del curso online gratuito del BID: Cartografía y Geografía Estadística

      Posted: 6 November 2023, 6:41pm CET

      El curso está dirigido al personal y/o profesionales del mundo de la estadística y de la geografía que estén interesados en conocer cómo se utilizan los mapas para las investigaciones de campo y cuál es el papel que juega la cartografía y las ciencias geográficas como apoyo a la ciencia estadística. No es necesario que se cuente con conocimientos previos muy especializados en manejo de herramientas de Sistemas de Información Geográfica (SIG).  Click en la imagen para más información.

      -Este curso es auto-regulado y no cuenta con clases o sesiones sincrónicas-

      -Este curso no tiene el acompañamiento de un tutor/a-

    • sur Redesigning the World's Transit Maps

      Posted: 6 November 2023, 9:11am CET by Keir Clarke
      The University of Freiburg has redesigned the transit maps of every city in the world. Zoom in on any location on the university's LOOM Global Transit Map and you can view the local transit network mapped using your choice of four different transit map projections.In every city in the world you can view the local transit map in either a geographical, octilinear, geo-octilinear or orthoradial
    • sur Free and Open Source GIS Ramblings: Exploring a hierarchical graph-based model for mobility data representation and analysis

      Posted: 5 November 2023, 10:17pm CET

      Today’s post is a first quick dive into Neo4J (really just getting my toes wet). It’s based on a publicly available Neo4J dump containing mobility data, ship trajectories to be specific. You can find this data and the setup instructions at:

      Maryam Maslek ELayam, Cyril Ray, & Christophe Claramunt. (2022). A hierarchical graph-based model for mobility data representation and analysis [Data set]. Zenodo. [https:]

      I was made aware of this work since they cited MovingPandas in their paper in Data & Knowledge Engineering“The implementation combines several open source tools such as Python, MovingPandas library, Uber H3 index, Neo4j graph database management system”

      Once set up, this gives us a database with three hierarchical levels:

      Neo4j comes with a nice graphical browser that lets us explore the data. We can switch between levels and click on individual node labels to get a quick preview:

      Level 2 is a generalization / aggregation of level 1. Expanding the graph of one of the level 2 nodes shows its connection to level 1. For example, the level 2 port node “Audierne” actually refers to two level 1 nodes:

      Every “road” level 1 relationship between ports provide information about the ship, its arrival, departure, travel time, and speed. We can see that this two level 1 ports must be pretty close since travel times are only 5 minutes:

      Further expanding one of the port level 1 nodes shows its connection to waypoints of level1:

      Switching to level 2, we gain access to nodes of type Traj(ectory). Additionally, the road level 2 relationships represent aggregations of the trajectories, for example, here’s a relationship with only one associated trajectory:

      There are also some odd relationships, for example, trajectory 43 has two ends and begins relationships and there are also two road relationships referencing this trajectory (with identical information, only differing in their automatic <id>). I’m not yet sure if that is a feature or a bug:

      On level 1, we also have access to ship nodes. They are connected to ports and waypoints. However, exploring them visually is challenging. Things look fine at first:

      But after a while, once all relationships have loaded, we have it: the MIGHTY BALL OF YARN ™:

      I guess this is the point where it becomes necessary to get accustomed to the query language. And no, it’s not SQL, it is Cypher. For example, selecting a specific trajectory with id 0, looks like this:

       MATCH (t1 {traj_id: 0}) RETURN t1

      But more on this another time.

      This post is part of a series. Read more about movement data in GIS.

    • sur From GIS to Remote Sensing: Downloading free satellite images using the Semi-Automatic Classification Plugin: the Download product tab

      Posted: 5 November 2023, 4:10pm CET
      This is part of a series of video tutorials focused on the tools of the Semi-Automatic Classification Plugin (SCP).In this tutorial, the Download products tab is illustrated, which allows for downloading free satellite images such as Landsat and Sentinel-2.You can find more information in the user manual at this link.
      Following the video tutorial.


      For any comment or question, join the Facebook group or GitHub discussions about the Semi-Automatic Classification Plugin.
    • sur QGIS Blog: QGIS 3.34 Prizren is released!

      Posted: 5 November 2023, 10:07am CET

      We are pleased to announce the release of QGIS 3.34 Prizren!

      Installers for Windows and Linux are already out. QGIS 3.34 comes with tons of new features, as you can see in our visual changelog. QGIS 3.34 Prizren is named after this year’s FOSS4G host city.

      We would like to thank the developers, documenters, testers and all the many folks out there who volunteer their time and effort (or fund people to do so). From the QGIS community we hope you enjoy this release! If you wish to donate time, money or otherwise get involved in making QGIS more awesome, please wander along to qgis.org and lend a hand!

      QGIS is supported by donors and sustaining members. A current list of donors who have made financial contributions large and small to the project can be seen on our donors list. If you would like to become a sustaining member, please visit our page for sustaining members for details. Your support helps us fund our six monthly developer meetings, maintain project infrastructure and fund bug fixing efforts.

      QGIS is Free software and you are under no obligation to pay anything to use it – in fact we want to encourage people far and wide to use it regardless of what your financial or social status is – we believe empowering people with spatial decision making tools will result in a better society for all of humanity.

    • sur A Map of the World That Is Gone

      Posted: 4 November 2023, 10:12am CET by Keir Clarke
      When Elan Ullendorff moved to South Philadelphia this summer he realized that he knew very little about the recent history of his new neighborhood. So he decided to change that. The result is Love Letters to Places I'll Never Meet, an interactive map which summons up the recent past of South Philadelphia by creating an interactive map of some now shuttered stores. To create his love letter to
    • sur Climate, Disaster, and Emergency Communities invited to Innovation Days 2023

      Posted: 3 November 2023, 2:00pm CET by Simon Chester

      The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) invites anyone involved in climate resilience, disaster response, and emergency management to attend OGC Innovation Days 2023. The event will be held December 5-7 at the American Red Cross Headquarters in Washington, D.C. Attendance is free for OGC Members using this link.

      OGC Innovation Days 2023 brings together diverse members of the climate, disaster, and emergency resilience and response communities to explore what OGC-enabled geospatial technologies have made possible and to ask: what do we need to do next?  

      This multi-day event will benefit anyone interested or involved in climate resilience, disaster response, or emergency management by providing an opportunity to learn about the latest geospatial data and technology developments from the OGC community, contribute to shaping future work, and interact with stakeholders from industry, government, research, and the private sector. 

      OGC has for many years been developing solutions that support climate and disaster resilience and response, from supporting the development of FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable) climate resilience information systems, to empowering first responders with the information they need, when they need it.

      But to most effectively address the multi-faceted challenges of the changing climate and associated disasters, we want to hear about the problems being faced by city-managers, community members, first responders, climate scientists, insurers, government bodies, and others, as they respond to the changing climate and associated disasters – so that we can use OGC’s collective expertise to address them.

      By bringing the climate, disaster, and emergency communities together, OGC Innovation Days 2023 provides a unique opportunity for attendees to meet people facing similar challenges to their own and learn about the solutions that worked for them, while guiding OGC towards creating impactful free and open solutions where none currently exist.

      The event runs across three days: a day of panels and discussions, a day of demonstrations, and a day exclusively for the OGC Strategic Member Advisory Committee, OGC Executive Planning Committee, and special guests. 

      Gain insights from experts from leading organizations, including: event hosts American Red Cross, OGC Strategic Members Department of Homeland Security (DHS) / Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), and United States Geological Survey (USGS), as well as others from across government and industry. See the full agenda here.

      Day 1 consists of panels and discussions centered around 4 topics: Disaster Response & Emergency Management; Wildfires; Climate Change & Disaster Risk Reduction; and the role that Artificial Intelligence and related technologies can play in building disaster and climate resilience. Throughout each panel, expect information on the FAIR solutions and workflows developed through OGC initiatives – such as the Disasters Pilot 2023 and the Climate Resilience Pilot – the gaps that remain between the data & tools we have and the ones we need, panelists’ successes & challenges, and audience feedback.

      Day 2 provides attendees the opportunity to see working demonstrations of cutting-edge solutions for climate, disaster, and emergency resilience and response developed in OGC COSI Program Initiatives or using OGC innovations in geospatial technologies such as Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning, Earth Observation, Analysis Ready Data (ARD), Decision Ready Indicators (DRI) for emergency response, FAIR systems & data, cloud-native geospatial, and more.

      Day 2 will also include a demonstration of General Dynamics Information Technology (GDIT)’s standards-based Raven mobile command-center, which collects and distributes mission-critical information at the edge. Powered by AI systems, the Raven can filter information so data-driven decisions can be made and disseminated to first responders, analysts, and decision makers in real-time.

      Join us at the American Red Cross Headquarters in Washington, DC, USA, to tackle climate, disasters, and emergencies together using FAIR geospatial data and systems. A video overview of the 2022 OGC Innovation Days event is available on OGC’s YouTube channel.

      For more information, including registration, agenda, venue & accommodation info, and more, visit the OGC 2023 Innovation Days webpage. The event is free for OGC Members – see this page on the OGC Portal for your discounted registration link. Sponsorship opportunities remain available, contact OGC to find out more.

      The post Climate, Disaster, and Emergency Communities invited to Innovation Days 2023 appeared first on Open Geospatial Consortium.

    • sur Star-Gazing Hotels

      Posted: 3 November 2023, 9:24am CET by Keir Clarke
      If you live in a town or city and you want to observe the true astronomical splendor of the night sky then you need to plan an evening away, somewhere away from the bright lights of the city, somewhere where there is very little light pollution. Luckily there is a new interactive map that will not only help you find locations with reduced light pollution but will also show you the locations of
    • sur 135,000 Years of Changing Sea Levels

      Posted: 2 November 2023, 9:08am CET by Keir Clarke
      The Sea Level Map is an interactive globe which visualizes global sea level and ice sheet interactions over the past 135,000 years. Using the map you can discover in which eras of Earth's history your home might have been under water.The date control at the bottom of the map allows you to adjust the sea level and ice sheets displayed by date. Using this control you can adjust the date shown on
    • sur Mapping the Oct 7 Hamas Attacks

      Posted: 1 November 2023, 8:32am CET by Keir Clarke
      Over the last three weeks news organizations around the world have produced many maps in their efforts to help explain the 2023 Israel-Hamas war. Many of these have been curated in the Data Vis Dispatch. Unfortunately the paywalls of many of the major news websites make a lot of these maps inaccessible to many.The current attacks on the Palestinian people by Israel are in response to the events
    • sur The Spookiest Places in the USA

      Posted: 31 October 2023, 3:39pm CET by Keir Clarke
      The United States is a very scary country. The Scariest Place Names in the US is an interactive map which plots some of the most frightening sounding locations across America. You've probably already heard of the towns of Hell in Michigan and Tombstone, Arizona. But have you heard of Transylvania, Louisiana and Slaughter Beach, Delaware. You can find many, many more spooky sounding locations on
    • sur GeoTools Team: GeoTools 29.3 released

      Posted: 31 October 2023, 10:01am CET
      The GeoTools team is pleased to announce the release of the latest maintenance version of GeoTools 29.3: geotools-29.3-bin.zip geotools-29.3-doc.zip geotools-29.3-userguide.zip geotools-29.3-project.zip This release is also available from the OSGeo Maven Repository and is made in conjunction with GeoServer 2.23.3 and GeoWebCache 1.23.2.&nbsp; We are
    • sur Halloween's Most Haunted Places

      Posted: 31 October 2023, 1:04am CET by Keir Clarke
      There are many haunted locations that you might want to visit (or avoid) on this All Hallows' Eve. Mashed World has released an interactive map which maps haunted locations across the world identified by the ChatGPT AI.Haunted Locations plots 37 locations in countries around the globe. These haunted locations include the Tower of London (the site of many historical executions), Bran Castle (
    • sur OGC Compliance Certification Available for v2.0 of the Web Processing Service (WPS) Standard

      Posted: 30 October 2023, 2:00pm CET by Simon Chester

      The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) is excited to announce that the Executable Test Suite (ETS) for version 2.0 of the Web Processing Service (WPS) Standard has been approved by the OGC Membership. Products that implement the Standard and pass the tests in the ETS can now be certified as OGC Compliant.

      The OGC Compliance Program offers a certification process that ensures organizations’ solutions are compliant with OGC Standards. It is a universal credential that allows agencies, industry, and academia to better integrate their solutions. OGC Compliance provides confidence that a product will seamlessly integrate with other compliant solutions regardless of the vendor that created them. 

      The WPS Standard supports the wrapping of computational tasks into executable processes that can be offered by a server through a web service interface and be invoked by a client application. The processes typically combine coverage, raster, vector, and/or point cloud data with well-defined algorithms to produce new information. Some of those algorithms may apply Machine Learning and other Artificial Intelligence (AI) approaches, as demonstrated by the OGC Testbed-16 initiative.

      Implementers of the WPS 2.0 Standard are invited to validate their products using the new test suite, which is available now on the OGC Validator Tool. Testing involves submitting the endpoint of a WPS implementation to be assessed. The validator tool sends the appropriate requests to the endpoint of the implementation and then evaluates the responses. These tests typically take only 5-10 minutes to complete. Once a product has passed the tests, the implementer can submit an application to OGC for use of the OGC Compliant trademark on their product. 

      To support developers with implementation of the standard, GeoLabs ZOO-Project 2.0 and the 52°North 52N Web Processing Service 4.0.0-beta.10 product have been designated as reference implementations of the standard after the software products successfully passed the compliance tests. 

      More information about the OGC compliance process, and how it can benefit your organization, is available at ogc.org/compliance. Implementers of version 2.0 of the WPS Standard – or other OGC Standards – can validate their products using the OGC Validator Tool.

      The post OGC Compliance Certification Available for v2.0 of the Web Processing Service (WPS) Standard appeared first on Open Geospatial Consortium.

    • sur Markus Neteler: GRASS GIS 8.3.1 released

      Posted: 30 October 2023, 1:47pm CET
      What’s new in a nutshell

      The GRASS GIS 8.3.1 maintenance release provides more than 60 changes compared to 8.3.0. This new patch release brings in important fixes and improvements in GRASS GIS modules and the graphical user interface (GUI) which stabilizes the new single window layout active by default.

      Some of the most relevant changes include: fixes for r.watershed which got partially broken in the 8.3.0 release; and a fix for installing addons on MS Windows with g.extension.

      Translations continue in Weblate, which automatically creates pull requests with the translated chunks. We’d like to thank the translators of all languages for their ongoing support!

      GRASS GIS 8.3.1 graphical user interface

      Full list of changes and contributors

      For all 60+ changes, see our detailed announcement with the full list of features and bugs fixed at GitHub / Releases / 8.3.1.

      Thanks to all contributors!

      Software downloads Binaries/Installers download

      Further binary packages for other platforms and distributions will follow shortly, please check at software downloads.

      Source code download

      First time users may explore the first steps tutorial after installation.

      About GRASS GIS

      The Geographic Resources Analysis Support System ( [https:]] ), commonly referred to as GRASS GIS, is an Open Source Geographic Information System providing powerful raster, vector and geospatial processing capabilities. It can be used either as a stand-alone application, as backend for other software packages such as QGIS and R, or in the cloud. It is distributed freely under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). GRASS GIS is a founding member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo).

      The GRASS Dev Team

      The post GRASS GIS 8.3.1 released appeared first on Markus Neteler | Geospatial Analysis | Remote sensing | GRASS GIS.

    • sur Oslandia: QField 3.0 release : field mapping app, based on QGIS

      Posted: 30 October 2023, 1:03pm CET

      We are very happy and enthusiasts at Oslandia to forward the QField 3.0 release announcement, the new major update of this mobile GIS application based on QGIS.

      Oslandia is a strategic partner of OPENGIS.ch, the company at the heart of QField development, as well as the QFieldCloud associated SaaS offering. We join OPENGIS.ch to announce all the new features of QField 3.0.

      Get QField 3.0 now !

      QField 3.0 screenshots

       

      Shipped with many new features and built with the latest generation of Qt’s cross-platform framework, this new chapter marks an important milestone for the most powerful open-source field GIS solution.

      Main highlights

      Upon launching this new version of QField, users will be greeted by a revamped recent projects list featuring shiny map canvas thumbnails. While this is one of the most obvious UI improvements, countless interface tweaks and harmonization have occurred. From the refreshed dark theme to the further polishing of countless widgets, QField has never looked and felt better.

      The top search bar has a new functionality that allows users to look for features within the currently active vector layer by matching any of its attributes against a given search term. Users can also refine their searches by specifying a specific attribute. The new functionality can be triggered by typing the ‘f’ prefix in the search bar followed by a string or number to retrieve a list of matching features. When expanding it, a new list of functionalities appears to help users discover all of the tools available within the search bar.

      QField’s tracking has also received some love. A new erroneous distance safeguard setting has been added, which, when enabled, will dictate the tracker not to add a new vertex if the distance between it and the previously added vertex is greater than a user-specified value. This aims at preventing “spikes” of poor position readings during a tracking session. QField is now also capable of resuming a tracking session after being stopped. When resuming, tracking will reuse the last feature used when first starting, allowing sessions interrupted by battery loss or momentary pause to be continued on a single line or polygon geometry.

      On the feature form front, QField has gained support for feature form text widgets, a new read-only type introduced in QGIS 3.30, which allows users to create expression-based text labels within complex feature form configurations. In addition, relationship-related form widgets now allow for zooming to children/parent features within the form itself.

      To enhance digitizing work in the field, QField now makes it possible to turn snapping on and off through a new snapping button on top of the map canvas when in digitizing mode. When a project has enabled advanced snapping, the dashboard’s legend item now showcases snapping badges, allowing users to toggle snapping for individual vector layers.

      In addition, digitizing lines and polygons by using the volume up/down hardware keys on devices such as smartphones is now possible. This can come in handy when digitizing data in harsh conditions where gloves can make it harder to use a touch screen.

      While we had to play favorites in describing some of the new functionalities in QField, we’ve barely touched the surface of this feature-packed release. Other major additions include support for Near-Field Communication (NFC) text tag reading and a new geometry editor’s eraser tool to delete part of lines and polygons as you would with a pencil sketch using an eraser.

      Thanks to Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Groupements forestiers Québec, Amsa, and Kanton Luzern for sponsoring these enhancements.

      Quality of life improvements

      Starting with this new version, the scale bar overlay will now respect projects’ distance measurement units, allowing for scale bars in imperial and nautical units.

      QField now offers a rendering quality setting which, at the cost of a slightly reduced visual quality, results in faster rendering speeds and lower memory usage. This can be a lifesaver for older devices having difficulty handling large projects and helps save battery life.

      Vector tile layer support has been improved with the automated download of missing fonts and the possibility of toggling label visibility. This pair of changes makes this resolution-independent layer type much more appealing.

      On iOS, layouts are now printed by QField as PDF documents instead of images. While this was the case for other platforms, it only became possible on iOS recently after work done by one of our ninjas in QGIS itself.

      Many thanks to DB Fahrwgdienste for sponsoring stabilization efforts and fixes during this development cycle.

      Qt 6, the latest generation of the cross-platform framework powering QField

      Last but not least, QField 3.0 is now built against Qt 6. This is a significant technological milestone for the project as this means we can fully leverage the latest technological innovations into this cross-platform framework that has been powering QField since day one.

      On top of the new possibilities, QField benefited from years of fixes and improvements, including better integration with Android and iOS platforms. In addition, the positioning framework in Qt 6 has been improved with awareness of the newer GNSS constellations that have emerged over the last decade.

      Forest-themed release names

      Forests are critical in climate regulation, biodiversity preservation, and economic sustainability. Beginning with QField 3.0 “Amazonia” and throughout the 3.X’s life cycle, we will choose forest names to underscore the importance of and advocate for global forest conservation.

      Software with service

      OPENGIS.ch and Oslandia provides the full range of services around QField and QGIS : training, consulting, adaptation, specific development and core development, maintenance and assistance. Do not hesitate to contact us and detail your needs, we will be happy to collaborate : infos+qfield@oslandia.com

      As always, we hope you enjoy this new release. Happy field mapping!

    • sur gvSIG Team: 19th International gvSIG Conference: Communication proposals submission is open

      Posted: 30 October 2023, 12:59pm CET

      The 19th International gvSIG Conference “Connected solutions” will be held on November 29th and 30th, 2023. Within the in-person and online alternation, this year the conferences will be held as online event, which facilitates participation both in terms of presentations/workshops and attendance.

      The communication proposals submission is now open, which can be sent to the email address conference-contact@gvsig.com, following the information indicated in the Communications section of the conference website.

      As always, registration for the conference will be free of charge, and will be able to be done once the program has been published.

      We encourage you to participate!

    • sur gvSIG Team: 19as Jornadas Internacionales de gvSIG: abierto el periodo de envío de propuestas de comunicación

      Posted: 30 October 2023, 10:20am CET

      Los días 29 y 30 de noviembre de 2023 tendrán lugar las 19as Jornadas Internacionales de gvSIG “Soluciones conectadas”. Dentro de la alternancia presencial-online, este año se realizan las jornadas en modalidad online, lo que facilita la participación tanto a nivel de ponencias/talleres como de asistencia.

      Ya está abierto el periodo de envío de propuestas de comunicación, que pueden enviarse a la dirección de correo electrónico conference-contact@gvsig.com, siguiendo la información indicada en el apartado «Comunicaciones» de la web de las jornadas.

      Como siempre, la inscripción a las jornadas será gratuita, y podrá realizarse una vez publicado el programa de las mismas.

      ¡Os animamos a participar!

    • sur The Little Free Library World Map

      Posted: 30 October 2023, 8:44am CET by Keir Clarke
      I shall be eternally grateful to my local community's book sharing box. As an avid reader being able to borrow and read secondhand books during lock-down kept me from becoming completely stir crazy. Since lock-down my nearest book-sharing box has almost fallen into disuse. Which is why I'm delighted to have found the Little Free Library World Map.The Little Free Library World Map is an
    • sur The World Map of Podcasts

      Posted: 28 October 2023, 10:07am CEST by Keir Clarke
      MapsFM is an interactive map which can help you find and listen to podcasts produced around the world. Listening to location based podcasts could be a great way to learn more about a planned travel destination or even to learn more about your local neighborhood or town. Now you can easily find and listen to location based podcasts by using the MapsFM map of the podcast world.Simply share your
    • sur 3D Middle-earth

      Posted: 27 October 2023, 10:44am CEST by Keir Clarke
      You can now explore the fantasy world of J.R.R Tolkein on a three dimensional globe. The Middle-earth 3D Map is a wonderful interactive map of the lands of the Shire, Mordor, Rohan and Gondor. A map that allows you to soar over the Misty Mountains, gaze upon the White City of Minas Tirith, and wander through the ancient forests of Lothlórien in a way that has never been possible before.Unlike
    • sur GeoCat: Cyber Resilience Act

      Posted: 26 October 2023, 4:16pm CEST

      As a small and medium business operating in Europe GeoCat BV is clearly affected by the forthcoming European Cyber Resilience Act (CRA).  We are a proud open source company and are concerned about our friends and partners caught up in the uncertainty around this proposed legislation.

      We applaud the goals of the CRA as security is a responsibility GeoCat handles with care on behalf of our customers and products.

      GeoCat is proud of the products we offer our customers: GeoCat Live, GeoNetwork Enterprise and GeoServer Enterprise. Each of these products are offered with a clear vendor relationship, an aspect of which is the handling and communication of security vulnerabilities.

      Part of the magic of free and open-source is the rich collaborations formed across industry, academia, and government working alongside non-governmental organizations and enthusiasts. We are concerned that the CRA as proposed places undue hardships on these relationships. These relationships form a network of trust, and cannot be reduced to a product relationship.

      We encourage regulators to seek expert input at this time. With so much of technology based in free and open-source technology we encourage regulators to look at ways to support security priorities with a deeper understanding.

      Dutch regulators are encouraged to read:

      The post Cyber Resilience Act appeared first on GeoCat B.V..

    • sur From GIS to Remote Sensing: Semi-Automatic Classification Plugin update: version 8.1

      Posted: 26 October 2023, 2:26pm CEST
      The Semi-Automatic Classification Plugin (SCP) has been updated to version 8.1 which solves a few bugs and in particular ease the installation of required dependencies.


      This update automatically tries to install the required library Remotior Sensus in the plugin directory, if it is not already installed in the QGIS environment, which allows for using the main functions of SCP.However, it is still recommended to follow the installation instructions to download the required dependencies.
      Moreover, an alternative Windows installation using the OSGeo4W network installer has been added to the user manual [https:]]
      Also, the user manual describes the installation in macOS [https:]]
      and Linux  [https:]]
      With this update the installation should work in most cases.
      For any comment or question, join the Facebook group or GitHub discussions about the Semi-Automatic Classification Plugin.
    • sur gvSIG Team: Osor Awards: gvSIG selected among the top 6 open-source projects by the European Commission

      Posted: 26 October 2023, 11:24am CEST

      We have reason to celebrate. The gvSIG project, submitted by the Generalitat Valenciana and the gvSIG Association, has been chosen by the Osor Awards jury as one of the top 6 open-source projects. Undoubtedly, this is a recognition of the highest caliber for the work carried out by these institutions and the entire gvSIG community around the project.

      About Osor Awards

      The European Commission’s Open Source Observatory (OSOR) has organised the EU Public Services Open Source Achievement Awards to honour and showcase the best open source solutions and initiatives created by or for the public administrations in Europe.

      As the title of the Awards indicates, the Jury focused on achievements of open source solutions and initiatives: the ambitious goals, determination in overcoming challenges, contribution towards furthering democracy, transparency and active participation of citizens in creating digital infrastructures serving constituents, the impact on their communities, and effective usage of public resources and exceptional response to solving problems.

      Award ceremony

      The representatives of the top 6 entries and the winner of the OSOR Community Award will be invited to Brussels for the event celebrating 15 years of our Observatory – OSOR Turns 15: From Pioneering to Mainstreaming Open Technologies in Public Services on 21 November 2023.

      … We’re going to Brussels!

    • sur Why the Spanish Like Vertical Living

      Posted: 26 October 2023, 10:38am CEST by Keir Clarke
      Spaniards like living in apartments. In fact Spain has one of the highest percentages of apartment dwellers in the world. Only in South Korea do more people live in collective dwellings. There are historical reasons why so many Spaniards live in apartment buildings. You can learn more about the historical causes of Spain's vertical living in El Diario's story map Spain lives in flats: why we
    • sur GRASS GIS: GRASS GIS 8.3.1 released

      Posted: 25 October 2023, 5:42pm CEST
      What’s new in a nutshell The GRASS GIS 8.3.1 maintenance release provides more than 60 changes compared to 8.3.0. This new patch release brings in important fixes and improvements in GRASS GIS modules and the graphical user interface (GUI) which stabilizes the new single window layout active by default. Some of the most relevant changes include: fixes for r.watershed which got partially broken in the 8.3.0 release; and a fix for installing addons on MS Windows with g.
    • sur How to Avoid a Train Wreck

      Posted: 25 October 2023, 9:26am CEST by Keir Clarke
      A very simple chart designed by a French railway engineer in the 19th Century has helped save millions of lives. Charles Ibry's train schedule, originally developed to timetable and schedule trains on the Paris - Le Havre line, is an extremely effective tool for timetabling and visualizing train traffic on a railway line. Perhaps most importantly it provides railway companies with a powerful
    • sur XYCarto: GRASS GIS, Docker, Makefile

      Posted: 25 October 2023, 12:47am CEST

      Small example of using Docker and Makefile to implement GRASS GIS. This blog is written to be complimentary to the Github repository found here. Included in this post is a more verbose explanation of what is happening in the Github repository. Users can explore the scripts to see the underlying bits that make it each step. The intention is to help simplify the GRASS set-up and execution of processes using GRASS operations.

      TL;DR

      GitHub repository is here with the method and documents.

      Summary

      This is a basic example of setting up scripted GRASS process through a Docker image and using a makefile to launch the process. The goal is remove the need to install GRASS on your machine and to fully containerize the process within Docker.

      It is assumed that users have a familiarity with Docker, Make, and GRASS.

      In short, the repo is built to launch a GRASS environment and call a script with the users GRASS commands. Ideally, users should be able to clone the Github repository, build the Docker locally (or pull it), and run a simple make command calling the primary script to perform the GRASS operations.

      Methods in the repository have been tested using Ubuntu and MacOS operating systems.

      Important

      This method is developed for scripting purposes and not intended for saving data in your GRASS environment. Using this method, each time the script is run the initial operation checks to see if a GRASS environment exists. If so, that environment is destroyed and a new environment is built.

      Requirements

      make
      docker
      

      Methods

      If you prefer try out the commands given below, you will need to clone the Git repo:

      git clone git@github.com:xycarto/grass-docker-make.git
      

      These are the two primary commands to set-up the GRASS, Docker, Make operations. Users will first need to build a Docker containing the GRASS installation. Inside the makefile are all the necessary components to find the Dockerfile and build the image. I’ve tagged this build with “xycarto” (see the top of the makefile); however, you can name this whatever you choose.

      Build GRASS Docker

      make docker-local
      

      Run GRASS Script

      With the Docker image in place, you can test if the method is working by checking the GRASS version. This make command uses two scripts. First, a script is called to construct the GRASS environment and then, call the script with all your GRASS operations. The second script is launched using:

      grass grass/GRASS_ENV/PERMANENT --exec bash grass-script.sh
      

      The —exec indicates the script is run within the GRASS environment giving users access to all the GRASS capabilities.

      GRASS needs to run within a designated projection. Included in the make command is a variable to set this. Users can implement any projection here using the EPSG value. The following is building a GRASS environment in New Zealand Transverse Mercator (NZTM), EPSG:2193:

      make grass-project proj="2193"
      

      This should output the GRASS version installed in the Docker.

      Modifications

      Users can implement any GRASS commands and methods in the run-grass.sh script, simply by modifying the file.

      How this can be used

      File variables can be given to the GRASS process back in the make command and passing this through the run-grass.sh script. For example, say you have a example.tif file you’d like to process in GRASS. Users can add a variable to the make file called tif. It might look like this in the makefile:

      grass-project:
      $(RUN) bash run-grass.sh $(proj) $(tif)
      

      The call of the command looks like:

      make grass-project proj=“2193" tif=example.tif
      

      Now with the makefile modified, you need to pass the variable through to the GRASS processing. First you need to modify the run-grass.sh script to accept the new variable from make. This can be done by adding the following line at the top:

      tif=$2
      

      Where $2 means the second argument in the command given. The run-grass.sh script now has the tif path variable. With this, you can now pass the path to the actual GRASS script by modifying the last line like so:

      grass grass/GRASS_ENV/PERMANENT --exec bash grass-script.sh $tif
      

      The grass-script.sh can now be modified to accept the tif variable by adding the following line at the top:

      tif=$1
      

      Once you get this all set up an running, the real power comes now in a scripted method run a large collection of tifs through a GRASS process.

      Let’s say you have 1000 tifs that need to run. You can list these tifs and simply develop a method like the the following:

      cat list-of-tifs.txt | xargs -P 1 -t -I % make grass-project proj=“2193" tif=%
      

      This method would sequentially process the tif list through your GRASS process.

      Having a hard time following? Please feel free to contact me and I’ll see if I can help.

    • sur CLIMOS and a FAIR data-to-information value chain

      Posted: 24 October 2023, 5:00pm CEST by Simon Chester

      The visible effects of climate change continue to grow over time, in both frequency and severity. Extreme meteorological events, such as heavy rains, severe storms, strong winds, and high temperatures, are causing extreme floods, landslides, droughts, heatwaves, wildfires, biodiversity loss, desertification and more, and severely impacting infrastructure, crops, livestock, and lives.

      As such, the last three decades have seen policy initiatives put in place to try and limit the impacts of global warming, reverse land degradation/desertification, stop the loss of biodiversity, protect finite natural resources, and reduce the risks associated with environmental disasters. These initiatives are summarised under the umbrella of the United Nations Agenda 2030 and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which together aim at increasing the resilience of people and systems to the changing environmental and socioeconomic conditions. Within this framework, Climate Action (SDG 13) and particularly Health (SDG 3) are defined goals to be tackled by the international community through collaborative solutions.

      Extreme weather-induced hazards and disasters certainly provide a very visible example of the impact of climate change. However, most of the mortality caused by climate change comes in less cataclysmic forms. One obvious example is the increased mortality rate during heatwaves. A less obvious example is the changing risk of exposure to disease for humans, other animals, and plants.

      Changes in temperature and precipitation, combined with changes in land use and cover, are creating spatial shifts in the life-cycle dynamics of disease-transmitting vectors, such as bats, small mammals, or mosquitoes, which has resulted in changing risks of exposure to disease. 

      The EU project CLIMOS, which OGC is a partner, is examining one such change by focussing on diseases transmitted by sandflies. CLIMOS works towards enhancing the scientific knowledge of the parameters that affect the spread of sandflies – and thus their ability to transmit disease – in the context of a changing climate. The project calls for technical systems that can combine and process: raw data output by climate models; earth observations of ongoing meteorological events and changes to land cover; and ecological data describing the life cycles of the sandflies. 

      Technical systems that are able to find, access, integrate, and process data for use in building climate resilience are coming to be known as Climate Resilience Information Systems (CRIS). CRIS are already being used to develop and provide interoperable Analysis Ready Data (ARD), usually in the form of data cubes, to scientists for further processing using scientific algorithms, and/or for developing Decision Ready Indicators (DRI) that allow for clear interpretation of current events by decision makers.

      The “raw data to information” value chain underpinning CRIS is made possible when the FAIR data principle is respected, that is that data and systems are developed in a manner that ensures they are Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable. CLIMOS is therefore focussing on the use of FAIR-aligned Climate Services for data assessment, scientific knowledge generation, early warning, and to better understand how meteorological conditions are increasing the risk of sand fly-borne diseases in particular areas.

      As part of the CLIMOS project, the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) is supporting the move toward FAIR systems for use in the emergency alert systems and data pipelines. Specifically, OGC is addressing the interoperability challenges faced when combining health, environmental, Earth observation, and climate model data. These challenges are being examined and addressed through various technical testbeds and data pilot studies that emphasise the FAIR principles, as well as within OGC Domain Working Groups. For the objectives of CLIMOS, OGC’s Climate Change Resilience, Emergency Management, and Health Domain Working Groups are each providing excellent sources of experience and knowledge related to these three aspects of the CLIMOS project.

      The work of CLIMOS is an essential contribution to realise the SDG 3 goal to “Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages.

      This post originally appeared on the CLIMOS Project blog.

      The post CLIMOS and a FAIR data-to-information value chain appeared first on Open Geospatial Consortium.

    • sur Marco Bernasocchi: QField 3.0 “Amazonia” is here – Feature-packed and super slick.

      Posted: 24 October 2023, 3:20pm CEST
      Enclosure: [download]

      We’re so excited and proud of this latest QField version that we’ve opted for a major 3.0 version update.

      Get it now

      Shipped with many new features and built with the latest generation of Qt’s cross-platform framework, this new chapter marks an important milestone for the most powerful open-source field GIS solution.

      Main highlights

      Upon launching this new version of QField, users will be greeted by a revamped recent projects list featuring shiny map canvas thumbnails. While this is one of the most obvious UI improvements, countless interface tweaks and harmonization have occurred. From the refreshed dark theme to the further polishing of countless widgets, QField has never looked and felt better.

      The top search bar has a new functionality that allows users to look for features within the currently active vector layer by matching any of its attributes against a given search term. Users can also refine their searches by specifying a specific attribute. The new functionality can be triggered by typing the ‘f’ prefix in the search bar followed by a string or number to retrieve a list of matching features. When expanding it, a new list of functionalities appears to help users discover all of the tools available within the search bar.

      QField’s tracking has also received some love. A new erroneous distance safeguard setting has been added, which, when enabled, will dictate the tracker not to add a new vertex if the distance between it and the previously added vertex is greater than a user-specified value. This aims at preventing “spikes” of poor position readings during a tracking session. QField is now also capable of resuming a tracking session after being stopped. When resuming, tracking will reuse the last feature used when first starting, allowing sessions interrupted by battery loss or momentary pause to be continued on a single line or polygon geometry.  

      On the feature form front, QField has gained support for feature form text widgets, a new read-only type introduced in QGIS 3.30, which allows users to create expression-based text labels within complex feature form configurations. In addition, relationship-related form widgets now allow for zooming to children/parent features within the form itself.

      To enhance digitizing work in the field, QField now makes it possible to turn snapping on and off through a new snapping button on top of the map canvas when in digitizing mode. When a project has enabled advanced snapping, the dashboard’s legend item now showcases snapping badges, allowing users to toggle snapping for individual vector layers. 

      In addition, digitising lines and polygons by using the volume up/down hardware keys on devices such as smartphones is now possible. This can come in handy when digitizing data in harsh conditions where gloves can make it harder to use a touch screen. 

      While we had to play favourites in describing some of the new functionalities in QField, we’ve barely touched the surface of this feature-packed release. Other major additions include support for Near-Field Communication (NFC) text tag reading and a new geometry editor’s eraser tool to delete part of lines and polygons as you would with a pencil sketch using an eraser.

      Thanks to Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Groupements forestiers Québec, Amsa, and Kanton Luzern for sponsoring these enhancements. 

      Quality of life improvements

      Starting with this new version, the scale bar overlay will now respect projects’ distance measurement units, allowing for scale bars in imperial and nautical units.

      QField now offers a rendering quality setting which, at the cost of a slightly reduced visual quality, results in faster rendering speeds and lower memory usage. This can be a lifesaver for older devices having difficulty handling large projects and helps save battery life.

      Vector tile layer support has been improved with the automated download of missing fonts and the possibility of toggling label visibility. This pair of changes makes this resolution-independent layer type much more appealing.

      On iOS, layouts are now printed by QField as PDF documents instead of images. While this was the case for other platforms, it only became possible on iOS recently after work done by one of our ninjas in QGIS itself.

      Many thanks to DB Fahrwgdienste for sponsoring stabilization efforts and fixes during this development cycle.

      Qt 6, the latest generation of the cross-platform framework powering QField

      Last but not least, QField 3.0 is now built against Qt 6. This is a significant technological milestone for the project as this means we can fully leverage the latest technological innovations into this cross-platform framework that has been powering QField since day one.

      On top of the new possibilities, QField benefited from years of fixes and improvements, including better integration with Android and iOS platforms. In addition, the positioning framework in Qt 6 has been improved with awareness of the newer GNSS constellations that have emerged over the last decade.

      Forest-themed release names

      Forests are critical in climate regulation, biodiversity preservation, and economic sustainability. Beginning with QField 3.0 “Amazonia” and throughout the 3.X’s life cycle, we will choose forest names to underscore the importance of and advocate for global forest conservation. 

      As always, we hope you enjoy this new release. Happy field mapping!

    • sur The London Tube Memory Game

      Posted: 24 October 2023, 9:20am CEST by Keir Clarke
      I think I've started a new mapping trend. At the beginning of October I released my TubeQuiz map. Since then I have spotted three other new map games which also require players to name all the stations on the London Underground network. The latest incarnation of a London Underground station memory game is I Know The Tube. I Know The Tube follows the now well known format of a map memory
    • sur KAN T&IT Blog: Trabajo en conjunto con el INEC de Costa Rica

      Posted: 23 October 2023, 9:51pm CEST

      Estamos felices de anunciarles que desde Kan vamos a trabajar codo a codo con el Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Censos de Costa Rica (inec.cr).
      Con la adopción del Marco Geoespacial y Estadístico Global (GSGF) propuesto por la ONU en América Latina y el Caribe a través de la Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), pondremos en marcha un conjunto de componentes tecnológicos específicos, incluyendo un gestor estadístico, un gestor de datos geoespaciales, APIs con posibilidad de consumir información de diferentes aplicaciones y un geoportal para visualizar, navegar y comparar la información estadística de este país.

      Al mismo tiempo, implementaremos componentes ya existentes en la comunidad como Kobo Toolbox, GeoNode, Airflow, MapLibre, Nominatim y Metabase para ofrecer una solución integral que abarque desde la recopilación de datos en terreno hasta la publicación de la información.

      Esta plataforma será una valiosa herramienta tanto para gobiernos, investigadores, empresas como para cualquier persona interesada en obtener información actualizada y confiable sobre la región.

      A medida de que vayamos avanzando, les contaremos más sobre este proyecto que nos tiene muy entusiasmados.

    • sur Stefano Costa: Research papers and case studies using iosacal

      Posted: 23 October 2023, 6:30pm CEST

      I have updated the documentation of iosacal with a new page that lists all research papers and case studies where the software gets a mention for being used.

      A collage of figures from the papers using iosacal

      The list is at [https:]] and it’s longer than I thought, with 6 papers ranging from Norway to Antarctica, from the Last Glacial Maximum to the European Middle Ages.

      It’s humbling to see this small piece of software find its way in so many research projects and I’m learning a lot by studying these publications.

      Some authors contributed to iosacal with new features and bug fixes, and that is the most accurate metric of a healthy project that I can think of.

      I’m going to add more useful content to the documentation as the main focus of the 0.7 release. In the meantime, you can continue using iosacal 0.6 in your research projects.

    • sur OGC Calls for Participation in its Open Science Persistent Demonstrator Pilot

      Posted: 23 October 2023, 3:00pm CEST by Simon Chester

      The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) invites organizations and individuals to join the OGC Open Science Persistent Demonstrator (OSPD) Pilot. The multi-year project will support collaborative open science for the scientific community, decision-makers, and the general public. Responses are due by December 1, 2023. Funding is available for Participants.

      Collaborative Open Science is essential to addressing complex challenges whose solutions lie in cross-sector integrations that leverage expertise and data from diverse domains while prioritizing integrity. By making it simple to connect data and platforms together in transparent, reusable and reproducible workflows, the OGC OSPD Pilot aims to enable innovation through collaborative open science. 

      OGC’s OSPD Pilot focuses on connecting geospatial and Earth Observation (EO) data and platforms to enable and demonstrate solutions that create capacity for novel research and accelerate its practical implementation. 

      The Pilot will produce a web portal to demonstrate how platforms operated by different organizations can be used for collaborative research and data representation, facilitate testing the compatibility of in-development data or platforms with other elements in a multi-platform workflow, and promote training in methods for collaborative, open innovation by providing learning and outreach materials.

      The OSPD Pilot will produce three main elements:

      1. The development of a web portal that demonstrates how platforms operated by different organizations can be used for collaborative research and data representation;
      2. A test environment for web platforms to explore mutual use and which provides a collaboration space for existing and in-development platforms to use each other and test aspects such as reproducibility of workflows; and
      3. The provision of learning and outreach materials that make the Open Science platforms known and accessible to a wide range of users and enable efficient use.

      The OSDP is sponsored by OGC Strategic Members the European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA), who will provide vision and leadership throughout the initiative.

      The OGC Open Science Persistent Demonstrator Pilot will be conducted under OGC’s Collaborative Solutions and Innovation (COSI) Program, a collaborative, agile, and hands-on prototyping and engineering environment where sponsors and OGC members come together to address location interoperability challenges while validating international open standards. To learn about the benefits of sponsoring an OGC COSI Program Initiative such as this, visit the OGC COSI Program webpage.

      More information on OGC’s OPSD Pilot, including the CFP document and how to respond, is available on the OGC Open Science Persistent Demonstrator Pilot webpage. Responses to the CFP are due by December 1, 2023.

      The post OGC Calls for Participation in its Open Science Persistent Demonstrator Pilot appeared first on Open Geospatial Consortium.

    • sur Mapping the Brussels Terrorist Attack

      Posted: 23 October 2023, 9:47am CEST by Keir Clarke
      On the evening of Monday October 16, a man drew a gun and opened fire on Swedish football fans in the streets of Brussels. The terrorist attack left two people dead and one injured. The suspect, Abdesalem Lassoued, fled the scene. Soon after the shooting a video was posted on social media in which Abdesalem claimed responsibility for the attack. The next morning the terrorist was tracked down,
    • sur Mapping the Growth of America

      Posted: 21 October 2023, 11:32am CEST by Keir Clarke
      This animated map shows the growth of built-up areas in San Francisco from 1860-1930. It visualizes the rapid growth of the city following the California gold rush in the second half of the 19th Century.This animated GIF was made using the interactive map Historical Built-Up Areas, 1810 - 2015. This amazing map uses data from the HISDAC-US: Historical Settlement Data Compilation for the United
    • sur Ephemeral Tweets

      Posted: 20 October 2023, 3:54pm CEST by Keir Clarke
      Musing appears to be an ephemeral version of Twitter. You might well argue that under Elon Musk the social media site 'X' itself appears to be disappearing into the ether at an alarming rate. But when I say that Musing is an ephemeral social media platform I mean that the social media messages themselves are short-lived, not the platform itself.Confused? Well don't be. Just open the Musing
    • sur Webinar: Location Innovation Academy for NMCA

      Posted: 20 October 2023, 3:34pm CEST by Simon Chester

      The online Location Innovation Academy recently launched to provide online training material for geospatial data management. It currently offers 12 e-learning modules in three clusters. These materials are designed to help government agencies, particularly national mapping organizations, make the most of their data and digital infrastructure.

      On Thursday, 26th October, 2023 at 11:00 – 12:30 CET, OGC and GEOE3 will host a webinar that aims to serve as an introduction to the Academy for National Mapping and Cadastral Agencies (NMCA), and will focus on the integration of climate and meteorological data into data portals used and provided by NMCA.

      Additionally, anyone who wishes to use materials from the online academy in their own training courses will learn the information needed to navigate the academy platform and its core content. Teachers, professors, coaches, consultants, and other professionals providing training in geoinformatics, spatial planning processes, and related fields are therefore also encouraged to attend.

      During these demonstrations, training materials for the use of OGC climate resilience application packages and for integration of meteorological data into portals managed by NMCA will be presented as examples out of the GEOE3 project.

      For more information about the Academy, or to enroll in a free course, visit the Location Innovation Academy website.

      Topics: Integration of Meteorological Data; Climate Application Packages
      Time: Thursday, 26th October. 11:00 – 12:30 CET 
      Registration: Click here for registration
      Virtual Room:  Dial-in info will be provided after registration. 
      Language: English

      Co-funded by the European Union GeoE3 Logo

      The post Webinar: Location Innovation Academy for NMCA appeared first on Open Geospatial Consortium.

    • sur GeoServer Team: Introducing GeoSpatial Techno with a Video Tutorial

      Posted: 20 October 2023, 2:00am CEST

      This is a community blog post introducing Geospatial Techno, along with a sample of one of their GeoServer training videos.

      GeoSpatial Techno is a startup focused on geospatial information that is providing e-learning courses to enhance the knowledge of geospatial information users, students, and other startups. The main approach of this startup is providing quality, valid specialized training in the field of geospatial information.

      ( YouTube | LinkedIn | Reddit | Facebook | X )

      Getting to know OGC web services and GeoServer software

      The course guides you in using GeoServer software to create geospatial web services, styles and publish them step by step simply and practically. Now, before delving into OGC web services, it is important to familiarize yourself with the various types of services.

      In this session, we introduced you to the basics of the OGC web services and GeoServer software. If you want to access the complete tutorial, simply click on the link.

      I would highly appreciate it if you could subscribe to my channel and share it with your friends to help spread this tutorial. By subscribing, you will gain complete access to the training video, which will enable you to enhance your skills. Moreover, sharing it with your friends guarantees that they can also benefit from this valuable resource. Thank you for your support.

      What is Service?

      A collection of operations, accessible through an interface, that allows a user to invoke a behavior of value to the user.

      What are Web Services?

      Web services are internet-based applications that can perform a wide range of functions, from simple tasks to complex business processes.

      What are GeoSpatial Web Services?

      GeoSpatial web services are online platforms that offer access to and analyze geographical information. They aim to overcome the lack of compatibility between different geospatial systems.

      Why do you need standard web services?

      Standard web services provide a common platform for communication between modern-day business applications that use different programming languages. This enables convenient interaction regardless of development language.

      What is OGC?

      The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) is an international organization that promotes the use of open standards to make geospatial information and services to be “FAIR”, which stands for Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable. This goal applies to various areas such as data sharing, data processing, sensor web, and the Internet of Things.

      What are OGC Web Services?

      OGC Web Services (OWS) are a set of standards that allow for seamless integration of various online geoprocessing and location services. With OWS, users can access and utilize services such as the Web Map Service (WMS), Web Feature Service (WFS), Web Coverage Service (WCS), and Web Map Tile Service (WMTS).

      WMS enables users to retrieve and obtain detailed information on maps of geospatial data. WFS allows for data manipulation operations on geographic features, including querying, creating, modifying, and deleting features. WCS provides access to raster datasets like elevation models and remote sensing imagery. WMTS serves pre-rendered or computed map tiles over the internet.

      These services provide an interoperable framework for accessing, integrating, analyzing, and visualizing online geodata sources, sensor-derived information, and geoprocessing capabilities.

      What is GeoServer?

      GeoServer is a Java-based server that allows users to view and edit geospatial data. Using open standards set forth by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), GeoServer allows for great flexibility in map creation and data sharing.

      Open and Share Your Spatial Data

      GeoServer is a powerful open-source tool for displaying spatial information through maps in various formats. The tool integrates OpenLayers, a free mapping library, for easy and quick map generation. Moreover, It supports standards like WMS, WFS, WCS, and WMTS, enabling data sharing, editing, and easy integration with web and mobile applications. With modular functionality and extensions, GeoServer offers extensive processing options. For example, the Web Processing Service (WPS) extension provides a wide range of processing options, and users can even create their extensions.

      Use Free and Open Source Software

      GeoServer is a free and open-source software that brings down the financial barrier to using GIS products. It is released every six months with new features, bug fixes, and improvements, providing a quick turnaround time. This transparent process often leads to faster advancements compared to closed software solutions. By using GeoServer, organizations can avoid software lock-in and save money on support contracts in the future.

      Integrate With Mapping APIs

      GeoServer is a versatile software that can integrate with popular mapping applications like Google Maps and Microsoft Bing Maps. It can also connect with traditional GIS architectures such as ESRI ArcGIS. OpenLayers and Leaflet are recommended as complementary tools to GeoServer for web mapping needs.

      Join the Community

      GeoServer has an active global community of users and developers, offering support through email lists. The software has a fixed release cycle and public issue tracker, ensuring transparency and regular updates. Commercial support is also available. Overall, using GeoServer means being part of a supportive community.

    • sur The Rising Risks of Wildfire

      Posted: 19 October 2023, 10:11am CEST by Keir Clarke
      Global heating has doubled the area of Europe which has a very high risk of wildfire. Civio has mapped the Copernicus Climate Change Service's meteorological forest fire risk index for every year since 1971. The map shows that The territory of Europe at high risk of fires has doubled in the last 50 years. Europeans living in the Canary Isles, Greece, Sicily and the Algarve - which all
    • sur Cloud Optimized GeoTIFF (COG) published as official OGC Standard

      Posted: 18 October 2023, 3:00pm CEST by Simon Chester

      The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) is excited to announce that the Cloud Optimized GeoTIFF (COG) Standard v1.0 has been approved by the OGC Membership for adoption as an official OGC Standard. COG, as an OGC Standard, formalizes existing practices already implemented by the community, such as the GDAL library or the COG explorer and other implementations.

      COG allows for the efficient streaming and partial downloading of imagery and grid coverage data on the web, and enables fast data visualization and geospatial processing workflows. COG-aware applications can efficiently stream/download only the parts of the information they need to visualize or process web-based data. With so much remote sensing imagery available in cloud storage facilities, the benefits of optimizing their visualization and processing will be widespread. COG is one of the preferred formats used in catalogs conforming to the SpatioTemporal Asset Catalog (STAC) specification, and sits alongside other emerging cloud-optimized formats of relevance to OGC, such as Zarr, COPC, and GeoParquet.

      The COG Standard specifies how TIFF files can be organized in a way that favors the extraction of convenient parts of the data at the needed resolution while remaining compatible with traditional TIFF readers. It also specifies how to use HTTP (or [HTTPS)] to transmit only the part of information needed without downloading the complete file. 

      The OGC COG Standard depends on the TIFF specification and the OGC GeoTIFF Standard. For large files, it depends on the BigTIFF specification. The standard takes advantage of some existing characteristics of the TIFF specification and the existing HTTP Range Request specification (IETF RFC 7233) and does not modify them in any way.

      The early work for crafting this OGC Standard was undertaken in the Open-Earth-Monitor Cyberinfrastructure (OEMC) project, which received funding from the European Union’s Horizon Europe research and innovation program under grant agreement number 101059548 and in the All Data 4 Green Deal – An Integrated, FAIR Approach for the Common European Data Space (AD4GD) project, which received funding from the European Union’s Horizon Europe research and innovation program under grant agreement number 101061001. 

      This work was followed by an activity within OGC’s Testbed-17 that formally specified COG requirements in the OGC Testbed-17: Cloud Optimized GeoTIFF specification Engineering Report. The lessons from the initiatives were then used to inform the standardization of COG by the OGC Membership. 

      OGC Members interested in staying up to date on the progress of this standard, or contributing to its development, are encouraged to join the GeoTIFF Standards Working Group (SWG) via the OGC Portal. Non-OGC members who would like to know more about participating in this SWG are encouraged to contact the OGC Standards Program.

      As with any OGC standard, the open Cloud Optimized GeoTIFF (COG) Standard v1.0 is free to download and implement.

      The post Cloud Optimized GeoTIFF (COG) published as official OGC Standard appeared first on Open Geospatial Consortium.

    • sur The 2023 Polish Election

      Posted: 18 October 2023, 9:14am CEST by Keir Clarke
      Sunday's Parliamentary Election in Poland saw the far-right PIS party win the most seats (194 seats) in the new parliament. However the opposition parties, consisting of the Civic Coalition (157 seats), Third Way (65 seats), and The Left (26 seats) achieved a combined share of 54% of the vote and are expected to now form a coalition government.Thanks to the growing trend among newspapers to
    • sur EOX' blog: Sentinel-2 cloudless 2022

      Posted: 18 October 2023, 2:00am CEST
      Introducing the latest marvel in Earth observation: Sentinel-2 Cloudless, the pinnacle of usability clarity in satellite imagery. This newest version takes your visual exploration to unprecedented heights, delivering pristine, cloud-free views of our planet with breathtaking detail and accuracy. Ev ...
    • sur Markus Neteler: GRASS GIS 8.3.0 released

      Posted: 17 October 2023, 6:58pm CEST
      What’s new in a nutshell

      The GRASS GIS 8.3.0 release provides more than 360 changes compared to the 8.2 branch. This new minor release brings in many fixes and improvements in GRASS GIS modules and the graphical user interface (GUI) which now has the single window layout by default. Some of the most relevant changes include: support for parallelization in three raster modules, new options added to several temporal modules, and substantial clean-up of g.extension, the module that allows the installation of add-ons. The GUI also received a lot of attention with many fixes and items reorganised. We have also adopted the Clang format and indented most of the C code accordingly. A lot of effort was put into cleaning up the C/C++ code to fix almost all compiler warnings.

      Translations have been moved from Transifex to Weblate, which automatically creates pull requests with the translated chunks. We’d like to thank the translators of all languages for their long term support!

      GRASS GIS 8.3

      Also, docker images have been updated and moved from the mundialis to the OSGeo organization at https://hub.docker.com/r/osgeo/grass-gis/.

      We have carried out quite some work in the GitHub Actions: we added support for “pre-commit” in order to reduce unnecessary runs of the automated checks, there were notable improvements in the code checking section and we have activated renovatebot to automatically maintain GitHub Actions.

      Last but not least, we have significantly improved the automated release creation to reduce maintainer workload and we have gained nine new contributors! Welcome all!!

      Full list of changes and contributors

      For all 360+ changes, see our detailed announcement with the full list of features and bugs fixed at GitHub / Releases / 8.3.0.

      Thank you all contributors!!

      Download and test! Binaries/Installers download

      Further binary packages for other platforms and distributions will follow shortly, please check at software downloads.

      Source code download

      First time users may explore the first steps tutorial after installation.

      About GRASS GIS

      The Geographic Resources Analysis Support System ( [https:]] ), commonly referred to as GRASS GIS, is an Open Source Geographic Information System providing powerful raster, vector and geospatial processing capabilities. It can be used either as a stand-alone application, as backend for other software packages such as QGIS and R, or in the cloud. It is distributed freely under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). GRASS GIS is a founding member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo).

      The GRASS Dev Team

      The post GRASS GIS 8.3.0 released appeared first on Markus Neteler | Geospatial Analysis | Remote sensing | GRASS GIS.

    • sur The Working Class History Map

      Posted: 17 October 2023, 9:11am CEST by Keir Clarke
      History is written by the victors. Which may be why the ruling classes, composed as they are by the wealthy and powerful, have always been more interested in promoting their own history and perspectives than in giving a voice to the lives and achievements of the working class. As a result our history lessons and textbooks always focus on the exploits of kings, politicians, and other elite
    • sur AI Geography Quizzes

      Posted: 16 October 2023, 8:41am CEST by Keir Clarke
      Do you know which ancient civilization created the earliest known map of the world? If you do then you might be able to beat Mashed Word's History of Maps quiz.  Mashed World has developed a number of online quizzes (including one on the History of Maps) which have all been written by the ChatGPT AI. To create each quiz Mashed World gives ChatGPT an input in this general format:Create a quiz
    • sur GeoTools Team: GeoTools 30.0 released

      Posted: 15 October 2023, 11:13pm CEST
      The GeoTools team is pleased to announce the release of the latest stable version of GeoTools 30.0: geotools-30.0-bin.zip geotools-30.0-doc.zip geotools-30.0-userguide.zip geotools-30.0-project.zip This release is also available from the OSGeo Maven Repository and is made in conjunction with GeoServer 2.24.0, GeoWebCache 1.24.0 and MapFish Print v2
    • sur GeoServer Team: GeoServer 2.24.0 Release

      Posted: 15 October 2023, 2:00am CEST

      GeoServer 2.24.0 release is now available with downloads (bin, war, windows), along with docs and extensions.

      This is a stable release of GeoServer recommended for production use. GeoServer 2.24.0 is made in conjunction with GeoTools 30.0, mapfish-print-v2 2.3.0 and GeoWebCache 1.24.0.

      Thanks to Peter Smythe (AfriGIS) and Jody Garnett (GeoCat) for making this release.

      Thanks to everyone who helped test the release candidate: JP Motaung & Nicolas Kemp, Georg Weickelt, Peter Smythe, Tobia Di Pisa, and Giovanni Allegri.

      We would like to thank our 2023 sponsors North River Geographic Systems Inc and How 2 Map for their financial assistance.

      Keeping GeoServer sustainable requires a long term community commitment. If you were unable to contribute time testing the release candidate, sponsorship options are available via OSGeo.

      Upgrade Notes

      GeoServer strives to maintain backwards compatibility allowing for a smooth upgrade experience.

      We have one minor change to share in this release:

      • URL Checks: The url check security setting is now enabled by default.

        In GeoServer 2.22.5 and 2.23.2 this setting was available for use, but was turned off by default. If you are not yet in a position to upgrade to 2.24.0 you may wish to enable the recommended setting.

      Security Considerations

      This release addresses security vulnerabilities and is considered an essential upgrade for production systems.

      • CVE-2023-43795 WPS Server Side Request Forgery
      • CVE-2023-41339 Unsecured WMS dynamic styling sld=url parameter affords blind unauthenticated SSRF

      See project security policy for more information on how security vulnerabilities are managed.

      IAU authority support and EPSG assumption removal

      The new gs-iau extension module provides support for planetary CRSs, sourced from the International Astronomical Union. This allows users to manage GIS data over the Moon, Mars, or even the Sun, with well known, officially supported codes.

      In addition to that, many bug fixes occurred in the management of CRSs and their text representations (plain codes, URL, URIs) so that the EPSG authority is no longer assumed to be the only possibility, in a variety of places, such as, for example, GML output. The code base has seen this assumption for twenty long years already, and while we made a good effort to eliminate the assumption, it could be still lurking in some places. Please test and let us know.

      Mars CRS in reprojection console

      Mars map, raster and vector data

      To learn more about this extension please visit the user-guide documentation. Thanks to Andrea Aime (GeoSolutions) for working on this activity.

      GeoServer Printing Extension Updates

      The printing extension has seen big changes - with a host of new functionality developed by GeoSolutions over the years. With this update the printing module can now be used out-of-the-box by GeoNode and MapStore (no more customization required).

      This update covers the release of MapFish Print 2.3.0 (and restores website user-guide).

      GeoServer documentation has been updated with configuration options covering the new functionality.

      Thanks to GeoSolutions for adding functionality to mapfish-print for the GeoNode project. Shout out to Tobia Di Pisa and Giovanni Allegra for integration testing. Jody Garnett (GeoCat) was responsible for updating the mapfish print-lib for Java 11 and gathering up the functionality from different branches and forks. And integrating the updated configuration instructions with the GeoServer User Guide.

      New Security > URL Checks page

      The previous 2.23 series added a new Check URL facility under the Security menu, but it was turned off by default, for backwards compatibility reasons. This functionality allows administrators to manage OGC Service use of external resources.

      This has been included in GeoServer 2.22.x and 2.23.x series for backwards compatibility.

      Backwards compatibility note:: This functionality is turned ON by default from GeoServer 2.24.0 onwards.

      URL Checks

      For information and examples on how to use the URL Check page, visit user guide documentation.

      Project Updates Updated Security Policy

      This release follows a revised security policy. Our existing “responsible disclosure policy” has been renamed, the practice is now called “coordinated vulnerability disclosure.” Last year we enabled GitHub private vulnerability reporting, we will now use these facilities to issue CVE numbers.

      Coordinated vulnerability disclosure

      Disclosure policy:

      1. The reported vulnerability has been verified by working with the geoserver-security list
      2. GitHub security advisory is used to reserve a CVE number
      3. A fix or documentation clarification is accepted and backported to both the “stable” and “maintenance” branches
      4. A fix is included for the “stable” and “maintenance” downloads (released as scheduled, or issued via emergency update)
      5. The CVE vulnerability is published with mitigation and patch instructions

      This represents a balance between transparency and participation that does not overwhelm participants. Those seeking greater visibility are encouraged to volunteer with the geoserver-security list; or work with one of the commercial support providers who participate on behalf of their customers.

      This change has already resulted in improved interaction with security researchers.

      Thanks to Jody Garnett (GeoCat) for this proposal on behalf of GeoCat Live customers.

      Developer updates Internal refactor to remove “org.opengis” package usage

      The GeoTools project moved away from using the org.opengis package after complaints from OGC GeoAPI working group representatives, using the same package name. Interfaces have been moved to the org.geotool.api package, along with some general clean up.

      While this does not affect GeoServer users directly, it’s of consequence for those that have installations with custom, home grown plugins that might have to be migrated as a consequence. For those, the GeoTools project offers a migration guide, along with a refactoring script that might perform the migration for you, or else, get you close to a working point. GeoServer itself has been migrated using these scripts, with minimal manual intervention.

      For more details, and access to the migration script, please see the GeoTools 30 upgrade guide.

      Thanks to Jody Garnett (GeoCat), Andrea Aime (GeoSolutions), and Ian Turton (ASTUN Technologies) for all the hard work on this activity. We would also like to thank the Open Source Geospatial Foundation for setting up a cross-project activity and financial support to address this requested change.

      • GEOS-11070 Upgrading to GeoTools 30.x series, refactor to org.geotools.api interfaces
      Community modules updates

      While not strictly part of this release, it’s interesting to know about some community module advances that can be found only in the the 2.24.x series.

      Two extensions are no longer actively supported and are now available as community modules:

      • GEOS-10960 Downgrade imagemap module to community
      • GEOS-10961 Downgrade xslt extension to community

      The following community modules have been removed (due to lack of interest):

      OGC API community modules continues to improve

      The OGC API community module keeps improving. In particular, thanks to the GeoNovum sponsorship, GeoSolutions made the OGC API Features module pass the OGC CITE compliance tests, for the “core” and “CRS by reference” conformance classes. Along with this work, other significant changes occurred:

      • Made the API version number appear in the service path, easing future upgrades
      • Support for configurable links, required to get INSPIRE download service compliance.

      In addition to that, the new “search” experimental conformance class allows to POST complex searches against collections, as a JSON document, in a way similar to the STAC API.

      Editable OGC API links

      Editable OGC API links

      Those interested in this work are encouraged to contact Andrea Aime (GeoSolutions).

      • GEOS-10924 Support JSON-FG draft encoding in OGC API - Features
      • GEOS-11045 Implement proposal “OGC API - Features - Part n: Query by IDs”
      • GEOS-10882 Add an option to remove trailing slash match in OGC APIs
      • GEOS-10887 Add angle brackets to OGC API CRS Header
      • GEOS-10892 Allow configuring custom links for OGC API “collections” and single collection resources
      • GEOS-10895 Make OGC API CITE compliant even if the trailing slash is disabled: landing page exception
      • GEOS-11058 Support other CRS authorities in OGC APIs
      • GEOS-10909 Don’t link from OGC API Features to WFS 2.0 DescribeFeatureType output, if WFS is disabled
      • GEOS-10954 Split ogcapi community module package into single functionality packages
      DataDir Catalogue loader

      For folks working with very large catalogues some improvement from cloud native geoserver are now available to reduce startup time.

      Thanks to Gabriel Roldan for folding this improvement into a community module for the rest of the GeoServer community to enjoy.

      • GEOS-11049 Community module “datadir catalog loader”
      GeoServer Access Control List Project

      The GeoServer Access Control List project is an independent application service that manages access rules, and a GeoServer plugin that requests authorization limits on a per-request basis.

      Gabriel Roldan is the contact point for anyone interested in this work.

      The vector mosaic and FlatGeoBuf modules sport significant performance improvements

      FlatGeoBuf is a “performant binary encoding for geographic data”, a single file format that also manages to be cloud native and include a spatial index. GeoServer provides access to this format thought the WFS FlatGeobuf output format, which not only can write the format, but also read it as a standard data store.

      The Vector Mosaic datastore supports creation of mosaics made of single file vector data, useful in situations where the access to data is targeted to sub-pages of a larger data set (e.g., data for a single time, or a single customer, or a single data collect, out of a very large uniform set of vectors) and the database storage for it has become either too slow, or too expensive.

      These two modules make a great combo for those in need to handle very large vector datasets, by storing the FlatGeoBuf on cheap storage.

      In particular, the FlatGeoBuf module saw speed improvements that made it the new “fastest vector format” for cases where one needs to display a large data set, all at once, on screen (PostGIS remains the king of the hill for anything that needs sophisticated filtering instead).

      For reference, we have timed rendering 4 million tiny polygons out of a precision farming collect, using a 7 classes quantile based SLDs. Here is a tiny excerpt of the map:

      Small sample out of 4 million polygons

      And here are the timings to render the full set of polygons, putting them all on screen, at the same time, with a single GetMap request:

      • PostGIS, 113 seconds
      • Shapefile, 41 seconds
      • Flatgeobuf, 36 seconds

      The tuning is not complete, more optimizations are possible. Interested? Andrea Aime is the contact point for this work.

      Release notes

      (Including the changes made in 2.24-RC, the release candidate)

      Improvement:

      • GEOS-11114 Improve extensibility in Pre-Authentication scenarios
      • GEOS-11130 Sort parent role dropdown in Add a new role
      • GEOS-11142 Add mime type mapping for yaml files
      • GEOS-11148 Update response headers for the Resources REST API
      • GEOS-11149 Update response headers for the Style Publisher
      • GEOS-10926 Community Module Proxy-Base-Ext
      • GEOS-10934 CSW does not show title/abstract on welcome page
      • GEOS-10973 DWITHIN delegation to mongoDB
      • GEOS-10999 Make GeoServer KML module rely on HSQLDB instead of H2
      • GEOS-11005 Make sure H2 dependencies are included in the packages of optional modules that still need it
      • GEOS-11059 Map preview should not assume EPSG authority
      • GEOS-11081 Add option to disable GetFeatureInfo transforming raster layers
      • GEOS-11087 Fix IsolatedCatalogFacade unnecessary performance overhead
      • GEOS-11090 Use Catalog streaming API in WorkspacePage
      • GEOS-11099 ElasticSearch DataStore Documentation Update for RESPONSE_BUFFER_LIMIT
      • GEOS-11100 Add opacity parameter to the layer definitions in WPS-Download download maps
      • GEOS-11102 Allow configuration of the CSV date format
      • GEOS-11116 GetMap/GetFeatureInfo with groups and view params can with mismatched layers/params

      Bug:

      • GEOS-11138 Jetty unable to start cvc-elt.1.a / org.xml.sax.SAXParseException
      • GEOS-11140 WPS download can leak image references in the RasterCleaner
      • GEOS-11145 The GUI “wait spinner” is not visible any longer
      • GEOS-8162 CSV Data store does not support relative store paths
      • GEOS-10452 Use of Active Directory authorisation seems broken since 2.15.2 (LDAP still works)
      • GEOS-10874 Log4J: Windows binary zip release file with log4j-1.2.14.jar
      • GEOS-10875 Disk Quota JDBC password shown in plaintext
      • GEOS-10899 Features template escapes twice HTML produced outputs
      • GEOS-10903 WMS filtering with Filter 2.0 fails
      • GEOS-10921 Double escaping of HTML with enabled features-templating
      • GEOS-10922 Features templating exception on text/plain format
      • GEOS-10928 Draft JSON-FG Implementation for OGC API - Features
      • GEOS-10936 YSLD and OGC API modules are incompatible
      • GEOS-10937 JSON-FG reprojected output should respect authority axis order
      • GEOS-10958 Update Spotbugs to 4.7.3
      • GEOS-10981 Slow CSW GetRecords requests with JDBC Configuration
      • GEOS-10985 Backup Restore of GeoServer catalog is broken with GeoServer 2.23.0 and StAXSource
      • GEOS-10993 Disabled resources can cause incorrect CSW GetRecords response
      • GEOS-11015 geopackage wfs output builds up tmp files over time
      • GEOS-11016 Docker nightly builds use outdated GeoServer war
      • GEOS-11033 WCS DescribeCoverage ReferencedEnvelope with null crs
      • GEOS-11060 charts and mssql extension zips are missing the extension

      Task:

      • GEOS-11134 Feedback on download bundles: README, RUNNING, GPL html files
      • GEOS-11141 production consideration for logging configuration hardening
      • GEOS-11091 Upgrade spring-security to 5.7.10
      • GEOS-11094 Bump org.hsqldb:hsqldb:2.7.1 to 2.7.2
      • GEOS-11103 Upgrade Hazelcast version to 5.3.x
      • GEOS-10248 WPSInitializer NPE failure during GeoServer reload
      • GEOS-10904 Bump jettison from 1.5.3 to 1.5.4
      • GEOS-10907 Update spring.version from 5.3.25 to 5.3.26
      • GEOS-10941 Update ErrorProne to 2.18
      • GEOS-10987 Bump xalan:xalan and xalan:serializer from 2.7.2 to 2.7.3
      • GEOS-10988 Update spring.version from 5.3.26 to 5.3.27 and spring-integration.version from 5.5.17 to 5.5.18
      • GEOS-11010 Upgrade guava from 30.1 to 32.0.0
      • GEOS-11011 Upgrade postgresql from 42.4.3 to 42.6.0
      • GEOS-11012 Upgrade commons-collections4 from 4.2 to 4.4
      • GEOS-11018 Upgrade commons-lang3 from 3.8.1 to 3.12.0
      • GEOS-11019 Upgrade commons-io from 2.8.0 to 2.12.0
      • GEOS-11020 Add test scope to mockito-core dependency
      • GEOS-11062 Upgrade [httpclient] from 4.5.13 to 4.5.14
      • GEOS-11063 Upgrade [httpcore] from 4.4.10 to 4.4.16
      • GEOS-11067 Upgrade wiremock to 2.35.0
      • GEOS-11080 Remove ASCII grid output format from WCS
      • GEOS-11084 Update text field css styling to look visually distinct
      • GEOS-11092 acme-ldap.jar is compiled with Java 8

      For the complete list see 2.24.0 release notes.

      About GeoServer 2.24 Series

      Additional information on GeoServer 2.24 series:

      Release notes: ( 2.24.0 | 2.24-RC )

    • sur From GIS to Remote Sensing: Basic Land Cover Classification Using the Semi-Automatic Classification Plugin

      Posted: 14 October 2023, 6:18pm CEST
      This is the first tutorial of the new Semi-Automatic Classification Plugin version 8. This tutorial describes the essential steps for the classification of a multispectral image (i.e., a modified Copernicus Sentinel-2 image): 
      1. Define the Band set and create the Training Input File
      2. Create the ROIs
      3. Create a Classification Preview
      4. Create the Classification Output

      Following the video of this tutorial.

      The detailed steps of this tutorial are described in the user manual, at the following link [https:]]
      I am going to write other tutorials to describe the available classification algorithms, and the other tools of the Semi-Automatic Classification Plugin.
      For any comment or question, join the Facebook group or GitHub discussions about the Semi-Automatic Classification Plugin.
    • sur Tokyo Live

      Posted: 14 October 2023, 11:42am CEST by Keir Clarke
      Tokyo Live is an amazing real-time animated map of the trains on Tokyo's rapid transit and metro networks. The map allows you to track and watch in real-time all of Tokyo's trains as they navigate and move around the city. All on top of an impressive 3D map of Tokyo. I can't help thinking that Tokyo Live was probably inspired by the equally impressive Mini Tokyo 3D, which is a 3D animated map
    • sur Intelligent Directions

      Posted: 13 October 2023, 8:56am CEST by Keir Clarke
      Fuzzy Maps is a new interactive map which uses AI to provide intelligent walking, cycling or driving directions. Unlike directions in Google Maps you can ask Fuzzy Maps to provide you with directions which include custom conditions or requirements.Fuzzy Maps provides a number of example searches that you might want to use, such as: Bike directions to a nearby history museum, avoid going over
    • sur The Hezbollah Map

      Posted: 12 October 2023, 9:44am CEST by Keir Clarke
      The Washington Institute's Lebanese Hezbollah is an interactive map dedicated to tracking the activities of the Islamist political party and militant group Hezbollah around the world. The purpose of the map is to serve as a repository of open-source information about Hezbollah’s global activities. The map is also intended to shed light "on the full geographic and temporal range of Hezbollah
    • sur GRASS GIS: Apply Now for New Mentoring Program

      Posted: 11 October 2023, 10:12am CEST
      The GRASS GIS project is launching a new mentoring program to help students, researchers, and software developers integrate GRASS GIS into their projects. Mentoring will be provided free of charge by experienced GRASS developers in a one-on-one setting allowing for remote and asynchronous communication. Mentors will work with participants to select the most appropriate and efficient tools and techniques to run and integrate GRASS tools into the participants’ workflow and provide advice and feedback during the implementation.
    • sur Mapping the Causes of Haze

      Posted: 11 October 2023, 9:55am CEST by Keir Clarke
      The Straits Times has published a fantastic visualization of how burning peatlands in Indonesia can lead to hazy conditions and dangerous air pollution in Singapore. In Why the Haze has Reached Singapore's Shores Again the Straits Times has created a stunning computer simulation of the 2019 haze which affected Singapore. The simulation uses an animated smoke layer to illustrate how burning
    • sur Guess Thy Neighbor

      Posted: 9 October 2023, 10:42pm CEST by Keir Clarke
      Can you name the four countries which border Greece? If you can then you should head straight over to Neighborle.Each day on Neighborle you are shown a different country on an interactive map. Your daily challenge is to name all the countries which border that day's highlighted country. Every time you name a correct bordering country it will be shown in green on the map. If you enter an
    • sur A recap of the 127th OGC Member Meeting, Singapore

      Posted: 9 October 2023, 2:52pm CEST by Simon Chester

      From September 25-29, 2023, more than 100 geospatial experts from around the world converged in Singapore to attend OGC’s 127th Member Meeting, with another 100+ attending online. As always, big thanks go out to our dedicated members that either attended in-person, or juggled lives across multiple timezones to attend virtually.

      Sponsored by OGC Principal Member, the Singapore Land Authority (SLA), the meeting was themed “Building future standards for the next generation of geospatial experts.” Once again, the Member Meeting was held in conjunction with the Singapore Geospatial Festival 2023 operated by SLA’s GeoWorks.

      Alongside the usual assortment of Standards Working Group (SWG) and Domain Working Group (DWG) meetings, the Member Meeting also saw several special sessions, including: a two-part Data Quality Workshop; a session on Modeling of Humanities’ Spatio-Temporal Data; a Digital Twins special session; a session on the OGC Academy; a Connecting Land and Sea special session; an Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) ad hoc; and a meeting of the OGC Asia Forum.

      Monday evening’s welcome reception celebrated Simple Features’ 25th birthday with a suitably delicious cake and an enthusiastic rendition of “Happy Birthday.” Simple Features, which is jointly published with ISO, is OGC’s earliest standard and describes how to model the location of “features” (a geometric representation of anything of interest) on a 2-dimensional space representing the surface of a planet. And of course there was the usual Wednesday night “VIP Dinner” (held at the delicious Red House Seafood), where Wuhan University received an OGC Community Impact Award, and a Diversity Luncheon held on Thursday.

      OGC Chief Standards Officer, Scott Simmons, leads the celebrations for Simple Features’ 25th birthday. Themes from the week

      As is befitting of the location in Singapore, with its advanced modeling of the whole nation, across the entirety of the Member Meeting were presentations related to Digital Twins – twins not only of the built environment, but for vegetation, the ocean, and the subsurface. Several Working Groups regularly include discussion on Digital Twins related to their scope, especially the Urban Digital Twins DWG. Related topics regarding the Metaverse and Interoperable Simulation and Gaming also continue regular appearances at OGC meetings.

      Marine and coastlines play an important role in economies and climate resilience strategies alike. OGC has a long-running pilot project on marine geospatial infrastructure, and we continue to refine models for describing and managing the coastal land-sea interface. We expect this work to be extended to the topics of ITS and logistics in the coming years, too.

      A Kick-off and a Joint Opening

      The OGC Member Meeting started on Monday, but as it was held jointly with the Singapore Geospatial Festival, the joint opening wasn’t until Tuesday. Monday, then, kicked off with a brief welcome session before the ever-popular Today’s Innovations, Tomorrow’s Technologies and Future Directions session.

      The topic of this meeting’s Future Directions session was Geospatial Artificial Intelligence. Dr. Gobe Hobona, OGC’s Director of Product Management, opened with an overview of where this topic fits in the context of previous sessions. He was then followed by three presentations:

      The speakers then participated in a panel fielding audience questions, including their views on the fundamental scope of the AI domain in a geospatial context, and what types of machine learning need OGC’s attention and which may be less relevant. OGC Members can access the presentations and a recording on this page in the OGC Portal.

      The joint Opening session on Tuesday featured keynote remarks from Colin Low, Chief Executive, SLA, and myself. The Guest of Honor was Dr. Mohamad Maliki Bin Osman, Minister in the Prime Minister’s Office, Second Minister for Education & Foreign Affairs. The session also featured presentations from local students who had performed impressive geospatial projects in their primary schools. It finished with a panel on “Geospatial: Enriching Minds, Empowering Lives,” which was also the key theme for the Singapore Geospatial Festival.

      The theme of the Member Meeting was “Building future standards for the next generation of geospatial experts.” Meeting Special Sessions

      The week continued with its usual array of SWG and DWG meetings, interspersed with several special sessions, outlined below. 

      The OGC Data Quality DWG held two sessions to comprise a workshop covering a breadth of data quality topics. The first session focused on the work of ISO/TC 211 on data quality measures and a registry to be hosted by OGC. The second session included presentations on the data quality requirements and considerations for a variety of types of geospatial data, including 3D and imagery. OGC Members can access the presentations and a recording on this page in the OGC Portal

      The session on Modeling of Humanities’ Spatio-Temporal Data was organized by participants in the HumSpatial Consortium, in which OGC participates, to address the complexities of representing “named places” in geospatial technologies. Presentations were given by scholars and practitioners from the humanities research and government sectors heavily involved with place-names and other types of geospatial data. OGC Members can access the presentations and a recording on this page in the OGC Portal

      Several sessions over the course of the week included presentations related to Digital Twins, often in the context of other domains, such as Artificial Intelligence or Data Quality. A dedicated special session for Digital Twins was organized to demonstrate different information types and practices and facilitate discussion on the relative meaning/relationship between digital twins, the metaverse, and the industrial metaverse. OGC Members can access the presentations and a recording on this page in the OGC Portal.  

      The OGC Academy is an information portal for distributing OGC knowledge related to the work of the Consortium and general geospatial interoperability. The web-based resources are under development with an estimated completion in 2026. Content is continuously refreshed. This session discussed capacity building and the academy more broadly. OGC Members can access the presentations and a recording on this page in the OGC Portal.

      The OGC Marine DWG organized a follow-up session to the one hosted last year in Singapore on “Connecting Land and Sea” to highlight activities in the OGC Federated Marine Spatial Data Infrastructure Pilot as well as work from OGC members around the world. OGC Members can access the presentations and a recording on this page in the OGC Portal. 

      The Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) ad hoc session highlighted work in ISO/TC 204, with whom OGC maintains a liaison, and explored the next steps for related work in OGC. Attendees generally accepted that ITS work intersected several OGC Working Groups and that a new effort to refine the road network model developed in TC 204 would be suitable for OGC activities. OGC Members can access the presentations and a recording on this page in the OGC Portal.

      At each OGC Member Meeting, one or more local forums meet to present and discuss topics of regional interest. On Friday of the Member Meeting, the OGC Asia forum offered a short history on the forum and five presentations from across the region. OGC Members can access the presentations and a recording on this page in the OGC Portal

      Winston Yap from the National University of Singapore’s Urban Analytics Lab presents during the Digital Twins Special Session. Closing and Important Things

      The Member Meeting’s Closing session began with the Important Things session and my rapid, 15-minute summary of the entire meeting week that included slides and content from a large number of Working Group sessions. OGC Members can access the presentation and a recording on this page in the OGC Portal.

      The Important Things session then proceeded with two discussion topics:

      • “Is the ‘fundamental model’ of geospatial 2D, 3D, 4D, or more D?” with consideration to whether the minimum number of dimensions is necessary, or whether all dimensions should just be assumed.
      • “The need to establish a policy for the governance of building blocks” where the TC concluded that more discrete definitions are needed for “building blocks” and other registered items that act as useful components in geospatial architecture.

      Notes from the session were recorded in the Etherpad “Important-Things-2023-09”, which is available to OGC Members via the Portal.

      The formal Closing Plenary then followed, which focuses on Working Group presentations and voting. The session advanced a number of Standards, SWGs, and documents toward vote or publication, so keep your eye on our news page, or subscribe to the “Standards updates” topic on the OGC Mailing List to get notifications sent straight to your inbox.

      Thank you

      Our 127th Member Meeting was yet another memorable meeting. It’s so great to see OGC Members discuss, collaborate, and drive technology and standards development forward in support of some of the biggest issues facing humanity. Once again, a sincere thank you to our members for investing their time and energy, as well as their dedication to making OGC the world’s leading and most comprehensive community of location experts.

      Be sure to join us at TU Delft, Netherlands, on March 25-29, 2024, for our 128th Member Meeting. Registration and further info will be available soon on ogcmeet.org. Sponsorship opportunities are also available – contact us for more info. You can subscribe to the “Events” and other topics on the OGC Mailing List to stay up to date on all aspects of OGC, including when registration goes live for our Member Meetings.

      In the meantime, don’t miss our 2023 Innovation Days event, December 5-7 in Washington, DC, USA. The multi-day event brings together policy makers, program decision-makers, and other experts in geospatial to showcase climate, emergency, and disaster management & resilience solutions that scale from local to global impacts.

      Attendees of the 127th OGC Member Meeting in Singapore, 2023.

      The post A recap of the 127th OGC Member Meeting, Singapore appeared first on Open Geospatial Consortium.

    • sur Light, Shadows & Fog

      Posted: 9 October 2023, 10:15am CEST by Keir Clarke
      Brody Smith has written a couple of useful tutorials on how you can customize lighting, building and terrain shadows, and fog settings in Mapbox GL powered maps. In Mapbox Lighting, Shadows, and Fog - Part 1 Brody looks at how lighting can be used to change the visual appearance of a map. In Mapbox Lighting, Shadows, and Fog - Part 2 Broady explores how tinkering with a map's fog settings can
    • sur Mapping the Barassi Line

      Posted: 9 October 2023, 1:45am CEST by Keir Clarke
      The Barassi Line is an imaginary line across Australia that approximately divides areas where Australian rules football or rugby league is the most popular football code. The line is named after Ron Barassi, a former player and coach in Australian Rules Football. The term the 'Barassi Line' was first used by historian Ian Turner in his 1978 Ron Barassi Memorial Lecture. The Barassi Line
    • sur The Ring of Rain

      Posted: 7 October 2023, 10:04am CEST by Keir Clarke
      X-Rain is an interactive map which visualizes the average amount of rainfall around the globe. The precipitation data used on the map is derived from historical satellite observations. This remote sensed data is not as accurate as data recorded by rain gauges but it is able to provide a more global view of precipitation levels as it is not limited to only those locations with rain gauges.The
    • sur Sean Gillies: Bear 100 recap

      Posted: 7 October 2023, 1:35am CEST

      A week ago I started the Bear 100 Endurance Run. I did not finish. This was my first DNF. I'm still trying to figure out what went wrong and evaluate how I responded.

      To recap: I rolled into the sixth aid station, Tony Grove, mile 51, at 9:59 p.m. I made a head to toe gear change. Underwear, pants, hat, socks, and shoes. Diaper ointment lube on my feet and privates. Ate potatoes and chicken noodle soup and refilled my bottles. I spent too much time there, but this was going to be my main stop before dawn, and I wanted to get properly set up for 8 hours of plugging through the night. I left at 10:43 p.m.

      Somewhere around mile 59, descending into Franklin Basin, my left ankle stopped working, and I limped into the Franklin Basin aid station (mile 62). After 15 minutes of triage, I decided to quit. I had no flexibility or stability in my left foot, and continuing seemed pointless.

      What happened? I couldn't remember a single major incident. I'd had a number of little wobbles earlier in the day and the descent from Tony Grove was pretty rough. I certainly picked up a little damage along the way. And I'd sprained this ankle four weeks ago. Maybe it wasn't strong enough to go 100 miles. It's possible that I fell asleep on my feet at 1:30 a.m. and rolled it. I was certainly sleepy enough at some points. Either the accumulation of stress was too much for my ankle, or an acute injury happened while I was checked out. Or both. I don't know for sure.

      I'm disappointed. Otherwise, things were going well. My gear choices were solid. I was eating and drinking well enough. Other than one toenail lost to kicking a rock, my feet were fine, no hotspots or blisters. My ankle was swollen for several days, but I didn't go far enough to wreck my quads or hips. Sigh.

      I will try this again.

      More about the race, photos, stories, etc, soon.

    • sur The London Underground Map Quiz

      Posted: 6 October 2023, 10:57am CEST by Keir Clarke
      The London Underground consists of 269 stations. I bet you can't name them all.London Underground Names is an easy map game which simply requires you to name all 269 stations on the London Underground network. Naming all 269 stations is a little tricky so I've provided you with a couple of aides to help you remind you of some of the station names. Due to my personal commuting history I can name
    • sur Your Perfect Weather Map

      Posted: 5 October 2023, 9:20am CEST by Keir Clarke
      We all have our own ideas about what the ideal weather conditions actually are. myPefectWeather is an interactive map which can help you find the locations in the United States which most closely match your own preferred temperatures, precipitation levels and /or amount of snowfall.If you select the 'options' button on the myPerfectWeather map menu you can begin to discover the locations
    • sur OGC and the International Data Spaces Association sign Memorandum of Understanding

      Posted: 5 October 2023, 9:00am CEST by Simon Chester

      The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and the International Data Spaces Association (IDSA) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) that outlines how they will together contribute to a flourishing data economy through the creation and development of standards for data spaces that ensure sovereign, interoperable, and trusted data sharing.

      “As the number of available data sources continues to grow, the challenge of integrating them into high-value products becomes ever greater,” commented OGC Chief Technology Innovation Officer, Ingo Simonis, Ph.D. “In order to develop effective solutions for cross-border data integration, international collaboration is critical. As such, OGC is eager to work with IDSA to tackle this task together.”

      “Committed to driving digital transformation, IDSA champions economic growth, innovation, and a cohesive data-sharing approach,” said Silvia Castellvi, Director of Research & Standardization at IDSA. “Partnering with OGC ensures our standards align and resonate. Enhancing features, like the geolocation of IDS Connectors, not only advances our standard but boosts its appeal for future developers and users.”

      OGC is an international non-profit consortium aiming to make geospatial (location) information and data services FAIR – Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable. IDSA is an international non-profit association that follows a user-driven approach to create a global standard for international data spaces and interfaces based on sovereign data sharing. 

      The MoU seeks to align activities between the two organizations so that OGC and IDSA Standards can work in tandem. This will be achieved in part through joint participation in potential future projects and initiatives, particularly in the areas of global supply chains, intelligent transport, and smart city data spaces.

      Projects in global supply chains and intelligent transport may include developing solutions that support the monitoring of shipping routes, tracking freight, sharing ocean currents and weather data, and more. Projects in smart city data spaces could focus on improving data sharing from business and technical perspectives, and could include data ranging from traffic to population migration.

      The two organizations have already identified several ongoing or completed projects relevant to their work together, including: Divine, Flexigrobots, DEMETER, ATLAS & AgriDataValue, Iliad, AD4GD, OGC Rainbow, and others.

      About IDSA
      The International Data Spaces Association (IDSA) is on a mission to create the future of the global, digital economy. Its 140+ member companies and institutions have created the International Data Spaces (IDS) standard: a secure system of sovereign and trusted data sharing in which all participants can realize the full value of their data. IDS enables new smart services and innovative business processes to work across companies and industries, while ensuring that the control of data remains in the hands of data providers. We call this data sovereignty.
      Visit internationaldataspaces.org for more information

      Press contact:
      Nora Grass
      +49 162 2104263
      nora.gras@internationaldataspaces.org

      The post OGC and the International Data Spaces Association sign Memorandum of Understanding appeared first on Open Geospatial Consortium.

    • sur SIG Libre Uruguay: IV Convención Científica Internacional UCLV 2023

      Posted: 4 October 2023, 7:29pm CEST

      La Universidad Central “Marta Abreu” de Las Villas, Institución de Excelencia de la Educación Superior en Cuba, convoca a la IV Convención Científica Internacional de Ciencia, Tecnología y Sociedad UCLV 2023, bajo el lema “Ciencia e Innovación para el Desarrollo Sostenible.”

      Podrán participar investigadores, académicos, docentes, directivos, empresarios, decisores de políticas de gobierno, estudiantes y otros actores sociales, implicados en la actividad de ciencia e innovación y protección del medio ambiente, además, contaremos con la presentación de conferencias magistrales de expertos de reconocido prestigio internacional y nacional, así como se desarrollarán otras actividades científicas desde una perspectiva multidisciplinar e intersectorial.

      Se contará tambien con la modalidad de participación virtual, facilitando a través de la plataforma la transmisión en vivo de actividades que se especificarán en el programa del evento.

      El encuentro se desarrollará del 13 al 17 de noviembre de 2023, en el destino turístico Cayos de Villa Clara: Santa María, Cuba.

      Destacamos especialmente el II Simposio Internacional sobre «Generación y Transferencia de Conocimiento para la Transformación Digital» SITIC2023, donde se desarrollarán un número importante de actividades: conferencias, curso, talleres. A continuación, la agenda

    • sur CoverageJSON v1.0 Adopted as OGC Community Standard

      Posted: 4 October 2023, 3:00pm CEST by Simon Chester

      The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) is excited to announce that version 1.0 of CoverageJSON has been approved by the OGC Membership for adoption as an official OGC Community Standard. CoverageJSON enables the development of interactive visualizations that display and manipulate spatio-temporal data within a web browser.

      The key design goals for CoverageJSON are simplicity, machine and human readability, and efficiency in the storage and use of complex data. 

      Coverages and collections of coverages can be encoded using CoverageJSON. Coverage data may be gridded or non-gridded, and data values may represent continuous values (such as temperature) or discrete categories (such as classes of land cover). 

      This OGC Community Standard was an outcome of the European Union project “Maximizing the Exploitation of Linked Open Data in Enterprise and Science” (MELODIES), which ran from 2013 to 2016, and was released under a Creative Commons 4.0 License by the University of Reading. There are several widely-used open source implementations and libraries available. Furthermore, CoverageJSON is one of the encodings supported by the OGC API – Environmental Data Retrieval Standard.

      CoverageJSON is based on the popular JavaScript Object Notation (JSON), and provides an effective, efficient format that’s friendly to web and application developers and consistent with the OGC API family of Standards. 

      CoverageJSON supports the efficient transfer of usable quantities of data from big data stores to lightweight clients, such as browsers and mobile applications. This enables straightforward local manipulation of the data by scientists and other users.

      The simplest and most common use-case is to embed all the data values of all variables in a Coverage object within the CoverageJSON document to create a self-contained, standalone, document that supports the use of very simple clients.

      Another simple use case is to put data values for each variable (parameter) in separate array objects in separate CoverageJSON documents that are linked from a parent CoverageJSON object. This is useful for a multi-variable dataset, such as one with temperature, humidity, wind speed, etc., to be recorded in separate files. This allows the client to load only the variables of interest.

      A sophisticated use case is to use tiling objects, where the data values are partitioned spatially and temporally, so that a single variable’s data values would be split among several documents. A simple example of this use case is encoding each time step of a dataset into a separate file, but the tiles could also be divided spatially, like a tiled map server implementation.

      As with any OGC Standard, the OGC CoverageJSON Community Standard is free to download and implement. Interested parties can learn more about, view, and download the Standard from OGC’s CoverageJSON Community Standard Page.

      The post CoverageJSON v1.0 Adopted as OGC Community Standard appeared first on Open Geospatial Consortium.

    • sur The 10 Day Fall Color Forecast

      Posted: 4 October 2023, 9:32am CEST by Keir Clarke
      The Fall Foliage Map 2023 is an interactive fall foliage map which is updated daily to provide you with both an accurate progress report of fall colors and a forecast of how fall colors in the United States are likely to change over the next ten days. According to Explore Fall the main factors influencing fall colors are the temperature and daylight. The Explore Fall predictive fall color model
    • sur QGIS Blog: Call for Proposals: QGIS Website Overhaul 2023/2024

      Posted: 3 October 2023, 6:45pm CEST
      ? Background

      Our web site ( [https:]] ) dates back to 2013, it is time for a revision!

      As well as modernizing the look and feel of the site, we want the content to be updated to represent changes in the maturity of the project.

      We want to appeal to new audiences, especially business and NGO decision makers (in particular the experience for the front pages), whilst still maintaining appeal to grass roots users (especially the lower level pages which contain many technical details and community collaboration notes).

      We want to enhance our fund raising efforts through a site that encourages people to contribute to, as well as take from, the project.

      ?????Existing effort

      First some key links:

      The above websites were created with a mix of technologies:

      • Sphinx (rst)
      • Doxygen
      • Custom Django Apps

      It will not be possible to unify the technology used for all of the above sites, but we want all of the web sites to have a cohesive appearance and the navigation flow between them to be seamless. For the main website at [https:]] and its child pages, we want to re-implement the site to provide a new experience – according to the design we have laid out in our figma board. Note that we want to follow this design. Some small tweaks will be fine but we are not looking for a ‘from scratch’ re-implementation of our design.

      This will be our website for the next 10 years – you need to hand it over to us in a way that we can continue working on it and maintaining it without your intervention.

      We are calling for proposals to help us with this migration as per the phases described below.

      Phase 1?: Project planning
      • ?Timeline
      • ? Proposed site structure
        • What content will be kept
        • What will be removed
        • What is new to be added
      • Keep front page as starting point
        • Suggest tweaks if needed
      • Establish a clear vocabulary of page types
        • Second and third level page design
        • Special pages such as
          • Download
          • Release countdown
          • Donation / sustaining members
          • Gallery
          • and any other you identify as non-standard second/third level
      • Guidance and standards for producing visuals like screenshots etc. For example, how we present QGIS screenshots in a flattering way.
      • Establish a plan for auxiliary sites:
        • Plugins.qgis.org
        • Api.qgis.org
        • Docs.qgis.org
        • etc. (see intro for more exhaustive list)
      • Iterative review and feedback from the QGIS web team should be incorporated from biweekly check in calls.

      ? Outcome: We have a clear roadmap and design guide for migrating all of our websites to a consistent unified experience.

      Phase 2?: Content migration of the main site

      During this phase the contractor will focus on migrating the content of the main site to the new platform.

      There will be an iterative review and feedback from the QGIS web team should be incorporated from biweekly check-in calls.

      ? Outcome: [https:]] new site goes live! (Target date end of February 2024)

      Phase 3?: Auxiliary sites migrations

      This is out of scope of the current call for proposals but should be part of the overall planning process:

      This would be a collaborative process involving a QGIS funded web developer and the consultant. 

      Iterative review and feedback from the QGIS web team should be incorporated from biweekly check in calls.

      ? Outcome: Auxiliary sites goes live with a cohesive look and feel to match the main site.

      ? What we will provide
      • Maps and screenshots, videos, animations (with inputs from design team)
      • Inputs in terms of content review
      ? Qualification criteria

      ? Must have an established track record of website design and content creation.

      ? Individuals or companies equally welcome to apply.

      ? Any potential conflict of interest should be declared in your application.

      ? Discussions will happen in English, with live discussions as well as written communication via issues or Pull request. Being reasonably fluent in English and understand the soft skills required to interact in a community project will be more than appreciated

      ? Payment milestones

      10 % Kick off

      40 % Phase 1 Completion

      50 % Phase 2 Completion

      ? Indicative budget

      We would like to point you to the QGIS Annual Budget so that you have a sense of our broad financial means (i.e. we will not be able to afford proposals in excess of €25,000 for phase 1+2).

      [https:]]

      ??? Technology choices and IP:
      • Must be wholly based on Open Source tooling (e.g. javascript, css, web frameworks)
      • Needs to be ideally implemented in Hugo (or Sphinx)
      • Must produce a static web site (except for existing django based sites)
      • Publication and development workflow will follow standard pull request / review process via our GitHub repositories
      • Mobile friendly
      • Site will be english only – any auto-translation tooling that can be added so that users can trivially see an auto-translated version of the site will be considered favourably.
      ? Proposal submission

      Your proposal should consist of no more than 5 pages (include links to relevant annexes if needed) covering the following:

      • Overview of yourself / your organization
      • Delivery timeline
      • Team composition
      • Budget for each phase
      • Examples of prior work
      • Bonus things to mention if relevant: GIS experience & working with Open Source projects

      Please send your proposal to finance@qgis.org by October 29nd 2023 midnight, anywhere on earth.

    • sur Shilling for Putin

      Posted: 3 October 2023, 10:04am CEST by Keir Clarke
      The Insider ('fully committed to investigative journalism and to debunking fake news') has created a new interactive map which exposes the 'fake experts' around the world that are spreading pro-Kremlin fake narratives and Russian propaganda. The Insider claims that what "unites the individuals featured on this map is their attempt to portray Putin's policies positively while disseminating
    • sur The October Solar Eclipse Map

      Posted: 2 October 2023, 9:37am CEST by Keir Clarke
      In 12 days time people in North, Central, and South America will be able to experience a solar eclipse. On Saturday, Oct 14 an annular solar eclipse will occur which will be visible in some areas of the United States, Mexico, and a number of countries in Central and South America. NASA's 2023 Solar Eclipse Explorer is a new interactive map which visualizes the path of the solar eclipse on Oct
    • sur GeoTools Team: GeoTools 30-RC released

      Posted: 2 October 2023, 12:49am CEST
      The GeoTools team is pleased to share the availability GeoTools 30-RC :geotools-30-RC-bin.zip geotools-30-RC-doc.zip geotools-30-RC-userguide.zip geotools-30-RC-project.zip org.opengis package removalThe main novelty in this release is the renaming of all "org.opengis" packages into "org.geotools.api" ones, to satisfy a request coming from OGC members that manage the "GeoAPI" project, using the
    • sur From GIS to Remote Sensing: Semi-Automatic Classification Plugin version 8 release date and dependency installation

      Posted: 1 October 2023, 7:53pm CEST
      This post is to announce that the new version 8 (codename "Infinity") of the Semi-Automatic Classification Plugin (SCP) for QGIS will be released the 8th of October 2023.This new version is based on a completely new Python processing framework that is Remotior Sensus, which will expand the processing capabilities of SCP, also allowing for the creation of Python scripts.




      The SCP requires Remotior Sensus, GDAL, NumPy and SciPy for most functionalities. Optionally, scikit-learn and PyTorch are required for machine learning. GDAL, NumPy and SciPy should already be installed along with QGIS.It might be useful to illustrate the installation steps of these dependencies before SCP is released.Read more »
    • sur Inside the Tombs & Pyramids of Egypt

      Posted: 1 October 2023, 9:54am CEST by Keir Clarke
      Ramesses I was the founding pharaoh of ancient Egypt's 19th Dynasty. Ramesses burial tomb was rediscovered in the Valley of the Kings by Giovanni Belzoni in October 1817. The tomb is decorated with the Book of Gates. The Book of Gates tells the story of how a newly deceased soul travels into the next world by passing through a series of 'gates'. It is believed that the depiction of this journey
    • sur How Not to Stare at the Sun

      Posted: 30 September 2023, 9:32am CEST by Keir Clarke
      If you have ever traveled by bus then you have probably experienced the frustration of discovering that your seat is in the direct glare of the sun and that you will now have to spend the majority of the journey squinting and attempting to shade your eyes from the sun's blinding rays.If you are a normal person you could avoid this problem simply by checking the sun's position in the sky and
    • sur The Global Impact of El Niño

      Posted: 29 September 2023, 10:20am CEST by Keir Clarke
      This month New South Wales in Australia has been experiencing temperatures up to 16C above the Sepetember average. This is likely the start of El Niño's grip on the country. In an El Niño year Australia typically experiences drought conditions. In July the the World Meteorological Organization said there is a 90% likelihood of El Niño conditions developing this year. They say that it likely to
    • sur Fernando Quadro: Verificações de URL no GeoServer

      Posted: 28 September 2023, 3:58pm CEST

      A versão 2.24.x do GeoServer traz entre suas novidades as verificações de acesso externo de URL que permite controlar as verificações executadas em URLs fornecidas pelo usuário que o GeoServer usará para acessar recursos remotos.

      Atualmente, as verificações são realizadas nas seguintes funcionalidades:

      • Solicitações WMS GetMap, GetFeatureInfo e GetLegendGraphic com folhas de estilo SLD remotas (parâmetro SLD)
      • Ícones remotos referenciados por estilos (o acesso aos ícones no diretório de dados é sempre permitido)
      • Solicitações WMS GetMap e GetFeatureInfo no modo de representação de recursos (parâmetros REMOTE_OWS e REMOTE_OWS_TYPE)
      • Entradas remotas WPS, como solicitações GET ou POST

      Para criar as regras de verificação, o GeoServer utiliza expressões regulares. Na internet existem sites disponíveis que irão te ajudar a definir um padrão de expressão regular Java (linguagem que o GeoServer é desenvolvido) válido. Essas ferramentas podem ser usadas para interpretar, explicar e testar expressões regulares. Por exemplo:

      [https:]] (habilitar o tipo Java 8)

      [https:]]

      1. Configuração de verificações de URL

      Navegue até a página Dados > Verificações de URL para gerenciar e configurar verificações de URL.

      Tabela de verificações de URL

      Use as opções Ativar/Desativar para habilitar este recurso de segurança:

      • Quando a caixa de seleção de verificações de URL está habilitada, as verificações de URL são realizadas para limitar o acesso do GeoServer a recursos remotos, conforme descrito acima. A ativação de verificações de URL é recomendada para limitar a interação normal dos protocolos Open Web Service usados ??para ataques de Cross Site Scripting.
      • Quando a caixa de seleção está desabilitada, as verificações de URL NÃO são habilitadas, o GeoServer recebe acesso irrestrito a recursos remotos. Desativar verificações de URL não é uma configuração segura ou recomendada.

      2. Adicionando uma verificação baseada em expressão regular

      Os botões para adicionar e remover verificações de URL podem ser encontrados na parte superior da lista de verificação de URL.

      Para adicionar uma verificação de URL, pressione o botão Adicionar nova verificação. Você será solicitado a inserir os detalhes da verificação de URL (conforme descrito abaixo em Editando uma verificação).

      3. Removendo uma verificação

      Para remover uma verificação de URL, marque a caixa de seleção ao lado de uma ou mais linhas na lista de verificação de URL. Pressione o botão Remover verificações de URL selecionadas para remover. Você será solicitado a confirmar ou cancelar a remoção. Pressionar OK para remover as verificações de URL selecionadas.

      4. Editando uma verificação

      As verificações de URL podem ser configuradas, com os seguintes parâmetros para cada verificação:

      • Nome: Nome da verificação, utilizado para identificá-lo na lista.
      • Descrição: Descrição da verificação, para referência posterior.
      • Expressão regular: Expressão regular usada para corresponder aos URLs permitidos
      • Habilitado: Caixa de seleção para ativar ou desativar a verificação

      Veja abaixo como é a tela de configuração:

      Tela de configuração de verificação de URL

      5. Testando verificações

      O formulário Testar verificações permite que uma URL seja verificada, informando se o acesso é permitido ou não.

      Pressione o botão Testar URL para realizar as suas verificações. Se pelo menos uma verificação corresponder ao URL, ele será permitido e o teste indicará a verificação que permite o acesso. Caso contrário, será rejeitado e o teste indicará que nenhuma verificação de URL foi correspondente.

      Tela de teste de verificações de URL

      Fonte: GeoServer Documentation

    • sur More Medieval Murder Maps!

      Posted: 28 September 2023, 9:52am CEST by Keir Clarke
      On Saturday 2 Feb 1297 three Oxford University students decided to celebrate the festival of the purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary by going on a frenzied rampage. On the evening of the festival John de Skurf and his two friends Michael and Madoc ran through the streets of Oxford with swords, bows, and arrows "attacking all passers-by". One John Metescharp was shot with an arrow by
    • sur Fernando Quadro: GeoServer ACL

      Posted: 27 September 2023, 9:20pm CEST

      A versão 2.24.x do GeoServer traz entre suas novidades o GeoServer ACL (Access Control List), um sistema de autorização avançado.

      Ele consiste em um serviço independente que gerencia regras de acesso e um plugin do GeoServer que solicita limites de autorização por solicitação.

      Como administrador, você usará o GeoServer ACL para definir regras que concedem ou negam acesso a recursos publicados com base nas propriedades da solicitação de serviço, como credenciais do usuário, o tipo de serviço OWS (OGC Web Services) e as camadas solicitadas.

      Essas regras podem ser tão abertas quanto conceder ou negar acesso a espaços de trabalho inteiros do GeoServer, ou tão granulares quanto especificar quais áreas geográficas e atributos de camada permitir que um usuário ou grupo de usuários específico veja.

      Como usuário, você executará solicitações ao GeoServer, como WMS GetMap ou WFS GetFeatures, e o mecanismo de autorização baseado no ACL limitará a visibilidade dos recursos e conteúdos das respostas àqueles que correspondem às regras que se aplicam às propriedades da solicitação e as credenciais do usuário autenticado.

      GeoServer ACL não é um provedor de autenticação. É um gerenciador de autorização que usará as credenciais do usuário autenticado, sejam elas provenientes de HTTP básico, OAuth2/OpenID Connect ou qualquer mecanismo de autenticação que o GeoServer esteja usando, para resolver as regras de acesso que se aplicam a cada solicitação específica.

      GeoServer ACL é Open Source, nascido como um fork do GeoFence. Como tal, segue a mesma lógica para definir regras de acesso a dados e acesso administrativo. Portanto, se você estiver familiarizado com o GeoFence, será fácil raciocinar como o GeoServer ACL funciona.

      Fonte: GeoServer ACL Project

    • sur Wuhan University receives OGC Community Impact Award

      Posted: 27 September 2023, 3:00pm CEST by Simon Chester

      The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) has announced Wuhan University, represented by Professor Peng Yue, as the latest recipient of the OGC Community Impact Award. The award was presented at the VIP Dinner of the 127th OGC Member Meeting in Singapore. 

      The Community Impact Award is given by OGC to highlight and recognize those members of the OGC Community who, through their exceptional leadership, volunteerism, collaboration, and investment, have had a positive impact on the wider geospatial community.

      “Wuhan University and Professor Peng Yue exemplify the mission of OGC through their combined efforts in technical leadership and international consensus building,” commented OGC Chief Standards Officer, Scott Simmons. “Their recent contributions toward standardization in AI were inclusive of the breadth of OGC membership and will prove truly useful for the geospatial community.”

      Wuhan University has, and continues to, make an impact within the OGC Community through their active leadership, international collaboration, and engagement across numerous OGC Collaborative Solutions and Innovation Program (COSI) Initiatives, Working Groups, Member Meetings, and the OGC China Forum. Professor Peng Yue was also the primary lead on the newly published Training Data Markup Language for Artificial Intelligence (Part 1) Standard.

      The OGC Community Impact award highlights the importance of collaboration, volunteering time and energy, advancing technologies and standards, raising awareness, and helping solve critical issues across the geospatial community. Wuhan University exemplifies all of these qualities in their work to drive innovation and standards for AI/ML and associated training data, and their efforts in leading the OGC Community in China.

      The post Wuhan University receives OGC Community Impact Award appeared first on Open Geospatial Consortium.

    • sur The Same Size As

      Posted: 27 September 2023, 8:12am CEST by Keir Clarke
      Gibraltar (left) compared to Central Park (right)Same Scales is an interactive map which allows you to compare two different locations side-by-side at the same scale. Comparing locations on the same map can be difficult because of the distortions caused by map projections. Same Scales helps you compare two different locations by showing each at the same scale on two different maps placed
    • sur The Global Problem of Forever Chemicals

      Posted: 26 September 2023, 9:07am CEST by Keir Clarke
      Forever chemicals are almost everywhere. If you search for PFAS contamination in any country, continent, or wildlife species around the world, the chances are you will find it. This revelation comes after a massive analysis of data by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) has exposed the global scale of the PFAS problem. PFAS or toxic "forever chemicals" are harmful substances that pollute the
    • sur KAN T&IT Blog: Análisis de calidad de información geoespacial. BID Perú.

      Posted: 25 September 2023, 9:21pm CEST

      En el marco del convenio con el Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo sede Perú (BID Perú), se llevó a cabo el proyecto de análisis de calidad de información geoespacial generados en el contexto del programa “Apoyo a la Plataforma Nacional de Ciudades Sostenibles y Cambio Climático en Lima” para el Ministerio de Ambiente de la República de Perú (MINAM). Este proyecto consistió en realizar el control de calidad de más de 400 capas de información geoespacial en función de los requerimientos establecidos en la familia de normas ISO 19100 que apuntan a regular y a normalizar la generación de información geoespacial con el objetivo de garantizar su interoperabilidad. El objetivo final de este trabajo fue aportar al proceso de mejora de la calidad e interoperabilidad de los datos al Plan Nacional de Adaptación al Cambio Climático (NAP, por sus siglas en inglés) en Perú. 

      El NAP consiste en un exhaustivo documento en donde se plasman los principales lineamientos para planificar la implementación de medidas diseñadas específicamente para reducir los riesgos derivados del impacto del cambio climático. A su vez, este documento pretende ser una fuente de información disponible para la toma de decisiones a nivel gubernamental en torno a ésta problemática. En este sentido, entre los objetivos que persigue el NAP, se presentan los siguientes: 

      1: Integrar y articular diversos instrumentos de gestión: Estrategia Regional de Cambio Climático, NDC y Planes Locales de Adaptación al Cambio Climático.  

      2: Desarrollar un análisis de riesgos climáticos a nivel nacional y regional para 5 áreas temáticas: Agua, Bosques, Agricultura, Pesca y Acuicultura y Salud; y para 4 amenazas clave: movimientos en masa, inundaciones, cambio en las condiciones de aridez y retroceso glaciar.

      3: Actualizar las medidas de adaptación establecidas en cada uno de los instrumentos de gestión, de acuerdo con las necesidades de las poblaciones y los ecosistemas.

      Para llevar a cabo el proceso de revisión y control de calidad de la información generada en este contexto, se trabajó en conjunto con las empresas productoras de la información geoespacial y en constante comunicación con representantes del BID Perú. Estas empresas habían sido convocadas por el Ministerio de Ambiente de Perú en convenio con BID y la organización World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) con el objetivo de analizar y generar información para: el “Plan de Adaptación Costera para el Área Metropolitana de Lima (AML)”, los “Estudios base sobre riesgo de desastres por riesgos naturales y crecimiento urbano en el AML” y los “Estudios de análisis urbanístico, prefactibilidad y diseños constructivos para acciones estratégicas de accesibilidad, multimodalidad y desarrollo orientado al transporte en el Sistema Integrado de Transporte (SIT) de Lima y Callao”. Toda la información geoespacial generada en el marco de estos tres productos fue el objeto de análisis de la consultoría realizada por Kan.  

      La premisa que guió el desarrollo de este proyecto fue alcanzar un nivel de calidad del dato óptimo que permitiera a los organismos disponibilizar la información producida garantizando el libre acceso, la interoperabilidad, la confiabilidad y la calidad. 

      En primera instancia se presentaron requisitos para la presentación de la información para asegurar el libre acceso. En este sentido, se solicitó que la información pudiera ser consultada a través de software libres, para que pudieran ser consumidos sin necesidad de pagar una licencia para hacerlo, siendo el formato “geopackage” el indicado para cumplir esta condición. 

      El análisis de la información se basó en una metodología específica desarrollada por el equipo SIG de Kan, fundamentada en las normas 19115-3, 19139, 19110 y 19157 que hacen referencia a los formatos e implementación de metadatos, a la catalogación de objetos geográficos y a la calidad del dato, respectivamente. Todo el contenido de estas normas se plasmaron en matrices analíticas que luego fueron aplicadas a cada una de las capas de información. Estas matrices permitieron relevar el estado de la información en relación a: la completud de sus metadatos, formatos de interoperabilidad de la información, calidad del dato, referencias sobre su linaje, uso y propósito, su consistencia lógica y topológica, el análisis de sus atributos, entre otros puntos. En total, se establecieron seis categorías de análisis: 

      A: Compatibilidad del conjunto de datos

      B: Interoperabilidad del conjunto de datos

      C: Interoperabilidad conjunto de metadatos

      D: Interoperabilidad – Metadatos de la capa

      E: Compatibilidad de la capa

      F: Calidad del dato

      Para cada categoría se definieron una serie de elementos de análisis que en total suman 47 ítems. El objetivo final de esta revisión fue cuantificar la usabilidad de la información geográfica producida, estableciendo un rango de usabilidad. Este rango va entre -1 y 1, siendo los valores cercanos a -1 aquellos que incumplen en más de un 50% los elementos establecidos para el análisis y los valores cercanos a 1 aquellos que cumplen en más de un 50% los elementos. De esta forma se obtuvo un resultado parcial de usabilidad por capa y un resultado global de usabilidad para el conjunto de datos. Luego de haber realizado el análisis, se confrontaron los resultados obtenidos con lo establecido por las normas, de esta manera se creó un documento de recomendaciones y sugerencias para la mejora de la calidad e interoperabilidad del dato. 

      Este proyecto permitió conocer la calidad de la información generada en el proyecto e identificar aquellos aspectos posibles de mejorar para garantizar la interoperabilidad de la información. Luego de este proceso de análisis, las empresas aplicaron las recomendaciones y sugerencias realizadas por el equipo SIG de Kan con el que alcanzaron un nivel óptimo de calidad del dato.

    • sur A Cool, Shady Spot with a Breeze

      Posted: 25 September 2023, 9:51am CEST by Keir Clarke
      One result of global heating is that nearly every summer most of us spend some time thinking about places we can go to avoid the oppressive heat. In recent years a number of interactive maps have been released which can help you find shady places to relax and escape the direct sun. These include popular shade maps such as JveuxDuSoleil, ShadeMap and Shadowmap. Now a new interactive map goes a
    • sur GeoServer Team: GeoServer 2.24-RC Release

      Posted: 25 September 2023, 2:00am CEST

      GeoServer 2.24-RC release is now available with downloads (bin, war, windows), along with docs and extensions.

      This is a release candidate intended for public review and feedback, made in conjunction with GeoTools 30-RC, GeoWebCache 1.24-RC, mapfish-print-v2 2.3-RC and geofence-3.7-RC.

      Thanks to Andrea Aime (GeoSolutions) and Jody Garnett (GeoCat) for working on making this release candidate.

      Release candidate public testing and feedback

      Testing and providing feedback on releases is part of the open-source social contract. The development team (and their employers and customers) are responsible for sharing this great technology with you.

      The collaborative part of open-source happens now - we ask you to test this release candidate in your environment and with your data. Try out the new features, double check if the documentation makes sense, and most importantly let us know!

      If you spot something that is incorrect or not working do not assume it is obvious and we will notice. We request and depend on your email and bug reports at this time. If you are working with commercial support your provider is expected to participate on your behalf.

      Keeping GeoServer sustainable requires a long term community commitment. If you are unable to contribute time, sponsorship options are available via OSGeo.

      IAU authority support and EPSG assumption removal

      The new gs-iau extension module provides support for planetary CRSs, sourced from the International Astronomical Union. This allows to manage GIS data over the Moon, Mars, or even the Sun, with well known, officially supported codes.

      In addition to that, many bug fixes occurred in the management of CRSs and their text representations (plain codes, URL, URIs) so that the EPSG authority is no longer assumed to be the only possibility, in a variety of places, such as, for example, GML output. The code base has seen this assumption for twenty years long, and while we made a good effort to eliminate the assumption, it could be still lurking in some places. Please test and let us know.

      Mars CRS in reprojection console

      Mars map, raster and vector data

      To learn more about this extension please visit the user-guide documentation. Thanks to Andrea Aime (GeoSolutions) for working on this activity.

      GeoServer Printing Extension Updates

      The printing extension has seen big changes - with a host of new functionality developed by GeoSolutions over the years. With this update the printing module can now be used out-of-the-box by GeoNode and MapStore (no more customization required).

      Thanks to GeoSolutions for adding functionality to mapfish-print for the GeoNode project. Jody Garnett (GeoCat) was responsible for updating the mapfish print-lib for Java 11 and gathering up the functionality from different branches and forks.

      New Security > URL Checks page

      This release adds a new Check URL facility under the Security menu. This allows administrators to manage OGC Service use of external resources.

      URL Checks

      For information and examples on how to use the URL Check page, visit user guide documentation.

      Developer updates Internal refactor to remove “org.opengis” package usage

      The GeoTools project moved away from using the “org.opengis” package after complaints from OGC GeoAPI working group representatives, using the same package name. Interfaces have been moved to the “org.geotool.api” package, along with some general clean up.

      While this does not affect GeoServer users directly, it’s of consequence for those that have installation with custom, home grown plugins that might have to be migrated as a consequence. For those, the GeoTools project offers a migration guide, along with a refactoring script that might perform the migration for you, or else, get you close to a working point. GeoServer itself has been migrated using these scripts, with minimal manual intervention.

      For more details, and access to the migration script, please see the GeoTools 30 upgrade guide.

      Thanks to Jody Garnett (GeoCat), Andrea Aime (GeoSolutions), and Ian Turton (ASTUN Technologies) for all the hard work on this activity. We would also like to thank the Open Source Geospatial Foundation for setting up a cross-project activity and financial support to address this requested change.

      • GEOS-11070 Upgrading to GeoTools 30.x series, refactor to org.geotools.api interfaces
      Community modules updates

      While not strictly part of this release, it’s interesting to know about some community module advances that can be found only in the the 2.24.x series.

      Two extensions are no longer actively supported and are now available as community modules:

      • GEOS-10960 Downgrade imagemap module to community
      • GEOS-10961 Downgrade xslt extension to community

      The following community modules have been removed (due to lack of interest):

      OGC API community modules continues to improve

      The OGC API community module keeps improving. In particular, thanks to the GeoNovum sponsorship, GeoSolutions made the OGC API Features module pass the OGC CITE compliance tests, for the “core” and “CRS by reference” conformance classes. Along with this work, other significant changes occurred:

      • Made the API version number appear in the service path, easing future upgrades
      • Support for configurable links, required to get INSPIRE download service compliance.

      In addition to that, the new “search” experimental conformance class allows to POST complex searches against collections, as a JSON document, in a way similar to the STAC API.

      Editable OGC API links

      Editable OGC API links

      Those interested in this work are encouraged to contact Andrea Aime (GeoSolutions).

      • GEOS-10924 Support JSON-FG draft encoding in OGC API - Features
      • GEOS-11045 Implement proposal “OGC API - Features - Part n: Query by IDs”
      • GEOS-10882 Add an option to remove trailing slash match in OGC APIs
      • GEOS-10887 Add angle brackets to OGC API CRS Header
      • GEOS-10892 Allow configuring custom links for OGC API “collections” and single collection resources
      • GEOS-10895 Make OGC API CITE compliant even if the trailing slash is disabled: landing page exception
      • GEOS-11058 Support other CRS authorities in OGC APIs
      • GEOS-10909 Don’t link from OGC API Features to WFS 2.0 DescribeFeatureType output, if WFS is disabled
      • GEOS-10954 Split ogcapi community module package into single functionality packages
      DataDir Catalogue loader

      For folks working with very large catalogues some improvement from cloud native geoserver are now available to reduce startup time.

      Thanks to Gabriel Roldan for folding this improvement into a community module for the rest of the GeoServer community to enjoy.

      • GEOS-11049 Community module “datadir catalog loader”
      GeoServer Access Control List Project

      The GeoServer Access Control List project is an independent application service that manages access rules, and a GeoServer plugin that requests authorization limits on a per-request basis.

      Gabriel Roldan is the contact point for anyone interested in this work.

      The vector mosaic and FlatGeoBuf modules sport significant performance improvements

      FlatGeoBuf is a “A performant binary encoding for geographic data”, a single file format that also manages to be cloud native and include a spatial index. GeoServer provides access to this format thought the WFS FlatGeobuf output format, which not only can write the format, but also read it as a standard data store.

      The Vector Mosaic datastore supports creation of mosaics made of single file vector data, useful in situations where the access to data is targeted to sub-pages of a larger data set (e.g., data for a single time, or a single customer, or a single data collect, out of a very large uniform set of vectors) and the database storage for it is become either too slow, or too expensive.

      These two modules make a great combo for those in need to handle very large vector datasets, by storing the FlatGeoBuf on cheap storage.

      In particular, the FlatGeoBuf module saw speed improvements that made it the new “fastest vector format” for cases where one needs to display a large data set, all at once, on screen (PostGIS remains the king of the hill for anything that needs sophisticated filtering instead).

      For reference, we have timed rendering 4 million tiny polygons out of a precision farming collect, using a 7 classes quantile based SLDs. Here is a tiny excerpt of the map:

      Small sample out of 4 million polygons

      And here are the timings to render the full set of polygons, putting them all on screen, at the same time, with a single GetMap request:

      • PostGIS, 113 seconds
      • Shapefile, 41 seconds
      • Flatgeobuf, 36 seconds

      The tuning is not complete, more optimizations are possible. Interested? Andrea Aime is the contact point for this work.

      Release notes

      New Feature:

      • GEOS-10992 Make GWC UI for disk quota expose HSQLDB, remove H2, automatically update existing installations
      • GEOS-11000 WPS process to provide elevation profile for a linestring

      Improvement:

      • GEOS-10926 Community Module Proxy-Base-Ext
      • GEOS-10934 CSW does not show title/abstract on welcome page
      • GEOS-10973 DWITHIN delegation to mongoDB
      • GEOS-10999 Make GeoServer KML module rely on HSQLDB instead of H2
      • GEOS-11005 Make sure H2 dependencies are included in the packages of optional modules that still need it
      • GEOS-11059 Map preview should not assume EPSG authority
      • GEOS-11081 Add option to disable GetFeatureInfo transforming raster layers
      • GEOS-11087 Fix IsolatedCatalogFacade unnecessary performance overhead
      • GEOS-11090 Use Catalog streaming API in WorkspacePage
      • GEOS-11099 ElasticSearch DataStore Documentation Update for RESPONSE_BUFFER_LIMIT
      • GEOS-11100 Add opacity parameter to the layer definitions in WPS-Download download maps
      • GEOS-11102 Allow configuration of the CSV date format
      • GEOS-11116 GetMap/GetFeatureInfo with groups and view params can with mismatched layers/params

      Bug:

      • GEOS-8162 CSV Data store does not support relative store paths
      • GEOS-10452 Use of Active Directory authorisation seems broken since 2.15.2 (LDAP still works)
      • GEOS-10874 Log4J: Windows binary zip release file with log4j-1.2.14.jar
      • GEOS-10875 Disk Quota JDBC password shown in plaintext
      • GEOS-10899 Features template escapes twice HTML produced outputs
      • GEOS-10903 WMS filtering with Filter 2.0 fails
      • GEOS-10921 Double escaping of HTML with enabled features-templating
      • GEOS-10922 Features templating exception on text/plain format
      • GEOS-10928 Draft JSON-FG Implementation for OGC API - Features
      • GEOS-10936 YSLD and OGC API modules are incompatible
      • GEOS-10937 JSON-FG reprojected output should respect authority axis order
      • GEOS-10958 Update Spotbugs to 4.7.3
      • GEOS-10981 Slow CSW GetRecords requests with JDBC Configuration
      • GEOS-10985 Backup Restore of GeoServer catalog is broken with GeoServer 2.23.0 and StAXSource
      • GEOS-10993 Disabled resources can cause incorrect CSW GetRecords response
      • GEOS-11015 geopackage wfs output builds up tmp files over time
      • GEOS-11016 Docker nightly builds use outdated GeoServer war
      • GEOS-11033 WCS DescribeCoverage ReferencedEnvelope with null crs
      • GEOS-11060 charts and mssql extension zips are missing the extension

      Task:

      For the complete list see 2.24-RC release notes.

      About GeoServer 2.24 Series

      Additional information on GeoServer 2.24 series:

      Release notes: ( 2.24-RC )

    • sur Sean Gillies: Bear 100 race week

      Posted: 24 September 2023, 11:06pm CEST

      This is it, race week. Wednesday I'm flying to Salt Lake City and driving to Logan. Friday before dawn I'm headed up the trail to Bear Lake.

      Week ~5 was a rest week at the end of a big training block. I biked and ran for less than 4 hours. Week ~4 I ran for 12 hours, 53 miles, and 8,500 feet of elevation gain. Much of that was above 10,000 feet in Rocky Mountain National Park, my go-to for accessible high country. I ran up to Granite Pass, 12,100 feet, just below the Longs Peak boulder field, and test drove the gels that will be served at the Bear 100. Spring Energy's Awesome Sauce is good! I could eat them all day. Spring's Speednut product is a bit harder for me to stomach. One of those every few hours might be all I can take.

      At the end of week ~4 I did some volunteering at the Black Squirrel Trail Half-Marathon, a race I've run several times. I helped park cars in the pre-race darkness and get first-timers pointed toward registration and the starting line. I saw the Milky Way in the clear, dark early morning sky. I caught up with the race directors, Nick and Brad, and saw other friends in the first mile of the course. Volunteering at events is always needed and fun. I recommend it.

      In week ~3, I ran for 9.5 hours, 42 miles, and 5,700 feet. In the interest of fine tuning, I went out in the heat of the day and took my poles. In week ~2, last week, I got the new COVID vaccination and did less running and more yoga and body-weight strength and mobility exercise. Split squats with dumbbells made me sore, but I am over it now.

      Where am I at now, in week ~1? I think I have enough experience and adequate training this year to finish. Three events of 40 miles, including one overnight, and one at very high elevation. The heart palpitations that were troubling me last year almost never occur now. I'm well over my most recent sinus infection. I've got all the gear I need and am physically and psychologically prepared for hot weather, cold weather, and rain or snow. The race will have more food than I can eat along the way and will deliver my five drop bags to aid stations and the finish line. I don't have a crew or pacer for the run, but think I'll be fine without. Reality is that it's harder to have these as you get older. Your family is busy and your friends are busy with their own families. I'm shy, but not shy about forming small ad-hoc teams on the trail, so I expect to be fine on that front.

      The Bear 100 Endurance Run starts with 5,000 feet of climbing in the first 10 miles. I can do this. At least it's at the beginning and not the end. That leaves only 17,000 feet for the last 90 miles. I'm joking about this to keep my spirits up. This will be super hard, a big bump up from my hardest week of training, and I'll need to go even deeper into the unknown than I've done at the Never Summer 100K. I'm ready to see what happens out there.

      The one thing that's concerning me is that I have a persistent ache in my right foot. Yesterday I went out for an hour in my Nike Terra Kiger's to see if I might want to bring them along as a shoe option. The answer is no: they don't have enough padding for my foot in its current condition. I feel worse today than yesterday. There's at least a small chance that I have a bone stress problem. The pain and swelling is right on the "N-spot". I'm not going to let this stop me from starting and will see how it goes on Friday. I've got a pretty high pain threshold and will be stashing some ibuprofen in my later drop bags. Cold rain and cold, numb feet, if the forecast holds, might help, too. How is that for positive thinking?

      If you want to follow along on Friday and Saturday, the live tracking should be at [https:]] . My bib number is 314. That website currently shows last year's race. I expect that this year's progress will be shown on Friday morning.

    • sur Sean Gillies: Status update

      Posted: 24 September 2023, 6:10pm CEST

      I'm pausing my job search and open source work to focus on next weekend's adventure. Forgive me if I don't respond before October 5-6. After I'm back I'll be prioritizing the job search over open source. Not for long, I hope!

    • sur Restricting the Right to Protest

      Posted: 23 September 2023, 9:39am CEST by Keir Clarke
      The right to protest is being restricted in countries around the world. Amnesty International's new interactive map, called Protect the Protest, highlights the growing numbers of human rights violations which are being committed by countries around the world aimed at removing the rights of citizens to legally protest. The Protect the Protest map sheds light on the types of repression that are
    • sur The Royal Parks of London

      Posted: 22 September 2023, 10:04am CEST by Keir Clarke
      There are eight Royal Parks in London. The parks are owned by the Crown and managed by the Royal Parks charity. The parks originated from land that the royal family once used for recreation and hunting. Over time, these lands were enclosed and became known as the Royal Parks. The public can enter and use the parks for free but public access to the parks remains at the grace and favor of the